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October 21 2014

shockingwoman8375

Vines Show Severity Of Flooding In Boulder

Joe BidenVice President Joe Biden, right, arrives with Gov. John Hickenlooper, center, in Greeley, Colo. after surveying the flood damage in the area and to meet with FEMA officials, Monday, Sept. 23, 2013. (AP Photo/The Denver Post, Kathryn Scott Osler, Pool)

Joe BidenVice President Joe Biden, center, visits with American Red Cross workers Bobbie Anderson, from Texas, left, and Jason Godinez, from Evans, Colo., one of the areas hit hard by the flooding, Monday, Sept. 23, 2013, inside the Disaster Recovery Center in Greeley, Colo., after flying in a helicopter over areas ravaged by the recent flooding. (AP Photo/The Denver Post, Kathryn Scott Osler, Pool)

Joe BidenAfter flying in a helicopter over areas ravaged by the recent flooding, Vice President Joe Biden, center front, flanked by Colorado elected officials and FEMA workers, looks at maps of the areas that were hit, Monday, Sept. 23, 2013, in Greeley Colo. (AP Photo/The Denver Post, Kathryn Scott Osler, Pool)

Joe BidenA Blackhawk helicopter with Vice President Biden aboard inspects flood damage near Estes Park, Colo., Monday, Sept. 23, 2013. Biden toured areas of the state hit by flooding. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

Colorado FloodingA section of highway is pictured near Boulder, Colo., on Monday, Sept. 23, 2013, during a tour of the area with Vice President Joe Biden. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)y

Joe BidenVice President Joe Biden speaks during a briefing on the floods in Colorado at the FEMA Disaster Recovery Center in Greeley, Colo., Monday, Sept. 23, 2013. Biden took a helicopter tour of the flood damage in Colorado before meeting with officials at the center. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

Joe Biden, Craig FugateVice President Joe Biden, right, talks with FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate after a briefing on the floods in Colorado at the FEMA Disaster Recovery Center in Greeley, Colo., Monday, Sept. 23, 2013. Biden took a helicopter tour of the flood damage in Colorado before meeting with officials at the center. AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

Joseph Biden, John HickenlooperColo. Gov. John Hickenlooper, left, listens to Vice President Joseph Biden speak to members of the media at a FEMA Disaster Recovery Center, following a day in which Biden and others surveyed area flood damage by helicopter, in Greeley, Colo., Monday Sept. 23, 2013. More than 15,600 people have applied for FEMA aid so far in response to the flooding, with FEMA aid at $19.6 million and rising. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Joseph Biden, John Hickenlooper, Mike CoffmannVice President Joseph Biden speaks to members of the media at a FEMA Disaster Recovery Center, joined by Colo. Gov. John Hickenlooper, near right, and Rep. Mike Coffman, R-Colo., following a day in which Biden and others surveyed area flood damage by helicopter, in Greeley, Colo., Monday Sept. 23, 2013. More than 15,600 people having applied for FEMA aid so far in response to the flooding, at $19.6 million and rising. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Joseph Biden, John Hickenlooper, Michael BennetColo. Gov. John Hickenlooper, left, introduces Vice President Joseph Biden, second from right, who stands with Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., far right, as Biden prepares to speak to members of the media at a FEMA Disaster Recovery Center following a day in which Biden and others surveyed area flood damage by helicopter, in Greeley, Colo., Monday Sept. 23, 2013. More than 15,600 people have applied for FEMA aid so far in response to the flooding, at $19.6 million and rising. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Joseph Biden, John Hickenlooper, Mike CoffmanVice President Joseph Biden waves after speaking to members of the media at a FEMA Disaster Recovery Center, joined by Colo. Gov. John Hickenlooper, second from left, and Rep. Mike Coffman, R-Colo., left, following a day in which Biden and others surveyed area flood damage by helicopter, in Greeley, Colo., Monday Sept. 23, 2013. More than 15,600 people having applied for FEMA aid so far in response to the flooding, with FEMA aid at $19.6 million and rising. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Joseph Biden, Cory GardnerVice President Joseph Biden speaks to members of the media at a FEMA Disaster Recovery Center, joined by Rep. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., right, following a day in which Biden surveyed area flood damage by helicopter, in Greeley, Colo., Monday Sept. 23, 2013. More than 15,600 people having applied for FEMA aid so far in response to the flooding, with FEMA aid at $19.6 million and rising. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Joseph BidenVice President Joseph Biden speaks to members of the media at a FEMA Disaster Recovery Center following a day in which Biden surveyed area flood damage by helicopter, in Greeley, Colo., Monday Sept. 23, 2013. More than 15,600 people having applied for FEMA aid so far in response to the flooding, with FEMA aid at $19.6 million and rising. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Joe Biden, John HickenlooperVice President Joe Biden leads Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, left, from a helicopter after landing in Greeley, Colo., Monday, Sept. 23, 2013. Biden, Hickenlooper and other officials took a tour of the flood stricken areas of the state. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

Joe BidenA Blackhawk helicopter with Vice President Biden aboard, inspects flood damage near Estes Park, Colo., Monday, Sept. 23, 2013. Biden took a helicopter tour of flood damage and to survey recovery efforts. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

 Flood-damaged mobile homes in Evans, Colo., on Friday, Sept. 20, 2013. Residents and local governments continue to assess the damage from historic flooding and begin the process of rebuilding and recovery. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Tara AndersonTara Anderson, 25, takes a break from cleaning out her flood-damaged home in Evans, Colo., on Friday, Sept. 20, 2013. Residents and local governments continue to assess the damage from historic flooding and begin the process of rebuilding and recovery. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 A rock slide partially blocks a closed canyon road, which links Boulder with the mountain town of Nederland, and which is damaged in places by recent flooding, up Boulder Canyon, west of Boulder, Colo., Friday Sept. 20, 2013. With snow already dusting Colorado’s highest peaks, the state is scrambling to replace key mountain highways washed away by flooding. More than 200 miles of state highways and at least 50 bridges were damaged or destroyed, not counting many more county roads. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 A guardrail hangs away from a closed canyon road, where some local residents are allowed to drive with caution, and which is washed out in places by recent flooding, up Boulder Canyon, west of Boulder, Colo., Friday Sept. 20, 2013. With snow already dusting Colorado’s highest peaks, the state is scrambling to replace key mountain highways washed away by flooding. More than 200 miles of state highways and at least 50 bridges were damaged or destroyed, not counting many more county roads. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 A guardrail hangs away from a closed canyon road, which links Boulder with the mountain town of Nederland, and which is washed out in places by recent flooding, up Boulder Canyon, west of Boulder, Colo., Friday Sept. 20, 2013. With snow already dusting Colorado’s highest peaks, the state is scrambling to replace key mountain highways washed away by flooding. More than 200 miles of state highways and at least 50 bridges were damaged or destroyed, not counting many more county roads. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 National Guard soldiers man a checkpoint on a closed canyon road, which is washed out in places by recent flooding, up Boulder Canyon, west of Boulder, Colo., Friday Sept. 20, 2013. With snow already dusting Colorado’s highest peaks, the state is scrambling to replace key mountain highways washed away by flooding. More than 200 miles of state highways and at least 50 bridges were damaged or destroyed, not counting many more county roads. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Santana Vega, left, and Karen Little, right, help Donna Wells, center, as she reacts to seeing photos of her flooded home in LaSalle, Colo., on Friday, Sept. 20, 2013. Wells' home was completely destroyed by floodwaters and she lost virtually all of her belongings. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Santana VegaSantana Vega puts on gloves and a mask before entering the home of Donna Wells to take pictures so she can see the condition of her home in LaSalle, Colo., on Friday, Sept. 20, 2013. Wells home was completely destroyed by floodwaters and she has lost virtually all of her belongings. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Donna Wells, Karen LittleDonna Wells, right, comforts Karen Little, left, as she cries over the extent of flood damage to her home in LaSalle, Colo., on Friday, Sept. 20, 2013. Both their homes were extensively damaged by floodwaters and they have lost virtually all of their belongings. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 A sign declares this flood-damaged home unsafe to enter or occupy in Evans, Colo., on Friday, Sept. 20, 2013. Residents and local governments continue to assess the damage from historic flooding and begin the process of rebuilding and recovery. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 The interior of the home of Donna Wells is damaged in LaSalle, Colo., on Friday, Sept. 20, 2013. Wells' home was completely destroyed by floodwaters and she has lost virtually all of her belongings. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 Oil workers try to lift a storage tank for condensate that was knocked over by floodwaters from the Platte River at an oil well site near LaSalle, Colo., on Friday, Sept. 20, 2013. Condensate is the mix of oil and water that is pumped out of the ground. The tank was intact and had not leaked. Numerous oil and gas well sites have been damaged by floodwaters throughout Colorado with several reports of spills. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Dan Ochsener, Karen LittleDan Ochsener, left, comforts Karen Little, right, as they stand surrounded by their flood-damaged belongings in LaSalle, Colo., on Friday, Sept. 20, 2013. Both their homes were extensively damaged by floodwaters. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Santana VegaSantana Vega takes camera phone pictures of the home of Donna Wells so she can see the condition of her home in LaSalle, Colo., on Friday, Sept. 20, 2013. Wells home was completely destroyed by floodwaters and she has lost virtually all of her belongings. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 Oil workers try to lift a storage tank for condensate that was knocked over by floodwaters from the Platte River at an oil well site near LaSalle, Colo., on Friday, Sept. 20, 2013. Condensate is the mix of oil and water that is pumped out of the ground. The tank was intact and had not leaked. Numerous oil and gas well sites have been damaged by floodwaters throughout Colorado with several reports of spills. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 A woman looks for reclaimable wood from a heap of household flooring, furniture and other items destroyed by flooding the previous week, in Boulder, Colo., Friday Sept. 20, 2013. The flood recovery process is underway along the front range of Colorado as people clean out flooded homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Jenna BrinkJenna Brink ducks under a piece of debris after cleaning out her flood-damaged trailer at the River Bend Mobile Home Park in Lyons, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013. Hundreds of evacuees were allowed past National Guard roadblocks Thursday to find a scene of tangled power lines, downed utility poles, and mud-caked homes and vehicles.(AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Jenna Brink, Christine BrinkJenna Brink, left, takes a break while clearing belongings from her flood-damaged trailer with her mother, Christine Brink, at the River Bend Mobile Home Park in Lyons, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013. Hundreds of evacuees were allowed past National Guard roadblocks Thursday to find a scene of tangled power lines, downed utility poles, and mud-caked homes and vehicles. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Dirk HuntingtonDirk Huntington checks on a friend's flood-damaged trailer at the River Bend Mobile Home Park in Lyons, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013. Hundreds of evacuees were allowed past National Guard roadblocks Thursday to find a scene of tangled power lines, downed utility poles, and mud-caked homes and vehicles. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 People walk through a severely flooded neighborhood in Lyons, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013. Residents displaced by last week's flooding in the Colorado canyon town were allowed past National Guard roadblocks Thursday to find a scene of tangled power lines, downed utility poles, mud-caked homes and vehicles, and work crews furiously clearing debris and trying to restore power, water and sewer service. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 This photo shows a road that was washed out by the flood in Lyons, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013. The recovery process has begun all along the front range as people clean out flooded homes and businesses. Local governments are starting to clear debris and repair infrastructure.(AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 A tractor is covered with debris in Lyons, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013. The recovery process has begun all along the front range as people clean out flooded homes and businesses. Local governments are starting to clear debris and repair infrastructure.(AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Lisa DunlapLisa Dunlap cleans mud off of toys in Longmont, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013. Hundreds of evacuees were allowed past National Guard roadblocks Thursday to find a scene of tangled power lines, downed utility poles, and mud-caked homes and vehicles. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

Shawna English, Sabrina NaftelVolunteers Shawna English, left, and Sabrina Naftel throw a piece of wet carpet onto a trash pile as they help clean up a home in Longmont, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013. The recovery process has begun all along the front range as people clean out flooded homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

Ron WestRon West cleans mud out of his shed in Lyons, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013. His home was spared by floodwaters. The recovery process has begun all along the front range as people clean out flooded homes and businesses. Local governments are starting to clear debris and repair infrastructure.(AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Roslynn Regnery, Emma BirathNeighbor Roslynn Regnery, right, gives a hug to Emma Birath, left, as they check on their homes in Lyons, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013. The recovery process has begun all along the front range as people clean out flooded homes and businesses. Local governments are starting to clear debris and repair infrastructure.(AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Flooded Oil and Gas WellsIn this Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013 photo, flood waters recede from an oil and gas well pump site near Greeley, Colo. Colorado’s floods shut down hundreds of natural gas and oil wells, spilled oil from one tank and sent inspectors into the field looking for more pollution. Besides the environmental impact, flood damage to roads, railroads and other infrastructure will affect the region’s energy production for months to come.  Analysts warn that images of flooded wellheads will increase public pressure to impose restrictions on drilling techniques such as fracking. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

 Railroad tracks are undercut by flooding in Longmont, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013. Rescuers continued efforts to reach stranded victims, while electricity and phone services were being restored to ravaged areas, allowing residents to contact family, friends or authorities. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

 Two women walk down a street piled high with wreckage from floodwaters as residents clear their homes of damaged property during cleanup in Longmont, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013. Rescuers continued efforts to reach stranded victims, while electricity and phone services were being restored to ravaged areas, allowing residents to contact family, friends or authorities. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

 This Sept. 17, 2013 photo provided by Ecoflight shows the result of flash floods that swamped well pads and in some cases dislodged storage tanks in Weld County, Colo. Hundreds of natural gas and oil wells along with pipelines are shut down by flooding, as state and federal inspectors gauge the damage and look for contamination from inundated oil fields. (AP Photo/Ecoflight, Jane Pargiter)

 Residents wait on the side of highway 66 to go back to their homes and begin the process of cleaning up after historic floods hit Lyons, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013. The recovery process has begun all along the front range as people clean out flooded homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Jeff Bails, Ben GlassHydrologist Jeff Bails, left, and Hydrologic Technician Ben Glass measure stream velocity of the Big Thompson River in Loveland, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. As floodwaters recede, cleanup and damage assessment continues after historic flooding. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 This photo shows a flooded field near Loveland, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. As floodwaters recede, cleanup and damage assessment continues after historic flooding. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 Danger is spray-painted on a damaged section of Old Highway 34 in Loveland, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. As floodwaters recede, cleanup and damage assessment continues after historic flooding. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 This photo shows flood damage to Old Highway 34 in Loveland, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. As floodwaters recede, cleanup and damage assessment continues after historic flooding. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 In this Sept. 17, 2013 photo, a crude oil storage tank lies on its side in flood water along the South Platte River, in Weld County, Colo. Hundreds of natural gas and oil wells along with pipelines are shut down by flooding, as state and federal inspectors gauge the damage and look for potential contamination from inundated oil fields. (AP Photo/John Wark)

 Elizabeth Dipert, left, helps her neighbor Katie Byrne, center, sift through thrown out flood refuse looking for valuables, at Byrne's home on Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013, in Longmont, Colo. Statewide, only about 22,000 homeowners have flood insurance policies, FEMA spokesman Jerry DeFelice said. With 2.2 million housing units in Colorado, according to Census figures, that means about 1 percent of the state’s residences have flood coverage. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Katie Byrne, left, her neighbor Elizabeth Dipert, center, and church volunteer Linda Pekarek, right, sift through thrown out rotting flood refuse looking for valuables, at Byrne's home in Longmont, Colo., Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013. Statewide, only about 22,000 homeowners have flood insurance policies, FEMA spokesman Jerry DeFelice said. With 2.2 million housing units in Colorado, according to Census figures, that means about 1 percent of the state’s residences have flood coverage. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Samantha Fennell sprays mud off of clothing on Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013, in Longmont, Colo. As water recedes and flows east onto the Colorado plains, rescuers are shifting their focus from emergency airlifts to trying to find the hundreds of people still unaccounted for after last week's flooding. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 While searching through flood debris, Athena Ross, second from left, smiles after finding a box containing her birth certificate, as church volunteer Linda Pekarek, right, claps her hands, in a neighborhood hard hit by last weeks flooding in Longmont, Colo., Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013. Also pictured helping are, left to right, resident Katie Byrne, neighbors Elizabeth Dipert and her brother Jonathan, and family friend Andre Whitehair. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 This Sept. 17, 2013 photo provided by Ecoflight shows the result of flash floods that swamped well pads and in some cases dislodged storage tanks in Weld County, Colo. Hundreds of natural gas and oil wells along with pipelines are shut down by flooding, as state and federal inspectors gauge the damage and look for contamination from inundated oil fields. (AP Photo/Ecoflight, Jane Pargiter)

 This Sept. 17, 2013 photo provided by Ecoflight shows the result of flash floods that swamped well pads and in some cases dislodged storage tanks in Weld County, Colo. Hundreds of natural gas and oil wells along with pipelines are shut down by flooding, as state and federal inspectors are gauging the damage and looking for contamination from inundated oil fields. (AP Photo/Ecoflight, Jane Pargiter)

Road RepairColorado Department of Transportation workers repair Highway 119 near Longmont, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. Statewide, only about 22,000 homeowners have flood insurance policies, FEMA spokesman Jerry DeFelice said. With 2.2 million housing units in Colorado, according to Census figures, that means about 1 percent of the state’s residences have flood coverage. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

Jessica Klauzer-ZimmermanJessica Klauzer-Zimmerman sits with her youngest son Liam, 8, in her flood damaged home in Boulder, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. Klauzer-Zimmerman woke up Thursday Sept. 12, to knee-deep water inside her townhouse, and has since been dealing with a maze of phone calls with insurance agents. Klauzer-Zimmerman said that each agent told her that her policy does not cover flood damage. Thousands of people who do not have flood insurance could face staggering costs to rebuild after the devastating floods in Colorado.(AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

Jessica Klauzer-ZimmermanJessica Klauzer-Zimmerman sits in her bedroom of her flood damaged home in Boulder, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. Klauzer-Zimmerman woke up Thursday Sept. 12, to knee-deep water inside her townhouse, and has since been dealing with a maze of phone calls with insurance agents. Each agent told her that her policy does not cover flood damage. Thousands of people who don't have flood insurance could face staggering costs to rebuild after the devastating floods in Colorado.(AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

Stan KoleskiDiane Carnahan, right, hugs her father Dave Dillon as they clean-up after their home was damaged by floodwaters in Loveland, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. Statewide, only about 22,000 homeowners have flood insurance policies, FEMA spokesman Jerry DeFelice said. With 2.2 million housing units in Colorado, according to Census figures, that means about 1 percent of the state’s residences have flood coverage. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 A damaged bridge on Highway 34 over the Big Thompson River near Loveland, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. As floodwaters recede, cleanup and damage assessment continues. Statewide, only about 22,000 homeowners have flood insurance policies, FEMA spokesman Jerry DeFelice said. With 2.2 million housing units in Colorado, according to Census figures, that means about 1 percent of the state’s residences have flood coverage. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 A search and rescue team looks for hazardous materials and possible flood victims near a flooded area in Loveland, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. As floodwaters recede, cleanup and damage assessment continues. Statewide, only about 22,000 homeowners have flood insurance policies, FEMA spokesman Jerry DeFelice said. With 2.2 million housing units in Colorado, according to Census figures, that means about 1 percent of the state’s residences have flood coverage. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 Floodwaters collapsed a portion of Namaqua Rd. in Loveland, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. As floodwaters recede, cleanup and damage assessment continues. Statewide, only about 22,000 homeowners have flood insurance policies, FEMA spokesman Jerry DeFelice said. With 2.2 million housing units in Colorado, according to Census figures, that means about 1 percent of the state’s residences have flood coverage. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 An field eroded by floodwaters near Namaqua Road in Loveland, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. As floodwaters recede, cleanup and damage assessment continues. Statewide, only about 22,000 homeowners have flood insurance policies, FEMA spokesman Jerry DeFelice said. With 2.2 million housing units in Colorado, according to Census figures, that means about 1 percent of the state’s residences have flood coverage. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 Workers walk by a damaged bridge on Highway 34 over the Big Thompson River near Loveland, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. As floodwaters recede, cleanup and damage assessment continues. Statewide, only about 22,000 homeowners have flood insurance policies, FEMA spokesman Jerry DeFelice said. With 2.2 million housing units in Colorado, according to Census figures, that means about 1 percent of the state’s residences have flood coverage. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

FloodKeenan Gates, at left, and Caleb Edelman, of ECOS Environmental and Disaster Restoration, assess the destroyed home of Gates mother on Tuesday, Sept. 17, in the town of Salina on Fourmile Canyon Drive in Boulder County. (AP Photo/Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso)

FloodSections of flood a damaged road on Fourmile Canyon Drive on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013 in Boulder County. Initial assessments have begun trickling in, but many areas remain inaccessible and the continuing emergency prevents a thorough understanding of the devastation's scope. (AP Photo/Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso)

 A farm is surrounded by floodwaters near Crook, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The floods that ravaged Colorado this past week also took a toll on the state's agricultural communities.. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 FILE - In this Sept. 13, 2013 file photo, cattle find dry ground near Fort Collins, Colo., as flooding continues to devastate the Front Range and thousands are forced to evacuate with an unconfirmed number of structures destroyed. The floods that ravaged Colorado this past week also took a toll on the state's agricultural communities. (AP Photo/Colorado Heli-Ops, Dennis Pierce) MANDATORY CREDIT

 A Boulder County Animal Control officer, and workers from the Humane Association work to rescue a cat from a destroyed home on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013 on Fourmile Canyon Drive in Boulder County, Colo. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso) NO SALES

 A highway, submerged and broken, winds through a flooded plain near the South Platte River, east of Greeley, Colo., Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. Since last week's devastating floods, state and local transportation officials are tallying the washed-out roads, collapsed bridges and twisted railroad lines. The rebuilding effort will cost hundreds of millions of dollars and take months, if not years. (AP Photo/John Wark)

 Victims of last week's devastating floods retrieve belongings outside a home near the East Platte River east of Greeley, Colo., Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The area's broad agricultural flatlands were especially hard hit by the high water. (AP Photo/John Wark)

 The sun sets over a flooded field near Crook, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The emergency airlifts of flood victims waned Tuesday, leaving rescue crews to systematically search the nooks and crannies of the northern Colorado foothills and transportation officials to gauge what it will take to rebuild the wasted landscape. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 The sun sets over a flooded field near Crook, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. Waters are winding their way through rivers and causing flooding further downstream. The emergency airlifts of flood victims waned Tuesday, leaving rescue crews to systematically search the nooks and crannies of the northern Colorado foothills and transportation officials to gauge what it will take to rebuild the wasted landscape. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 Four year old Elijah Obrien looks at his muddy basement which was damaged when recent floods swept through Longmont, Colo., Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013. As water recedes and flows east onto the Colorado plains, rescuers are shifting their focus from emergency airlifts to trying to find the hundreds of people still unaccounted for after last week's devastating flooding. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Siblings, left to right, Elizabeth, 13, Jonathan, 9, Aaron, 11, and Kitty, 6, Dipert wash mud from the clothing of family friends from church, in the wake of massive flooding which days earlier swept through Longmont, Colo., Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013. As water recedes and flows east onto the Colorado plains, rescuers are shifting their focus from emergency airlifts to trying to find the hundreds of people still unaccounted for after last week's devastating flooding. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Shanda Roberson disposes of destroyed items from her home, after recent floods swept through Longmont, Colo., Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013. As water recedes and flows east onto the Colorado plains, rescuers are shifting their focus from emergency airlifts to trying to find the hundreds of people still unaccounted for after last week's devastating flooding. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Local resident Chad Obrien comforts his four year old son Elijah, as he works to remove waterlogged and contaminated floors and walls from his flooded basement, which was wrecked in recent flooding, in Longmont, Colo., Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013. As water recedes and flows east onto the Colorado plains, rescuers are shifting their focus from emergency airlifts to trying to find the hundreds of people still unaccounted for after last week's devastating flooding. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

BJ Cox, Diane FerrellBJ Cox, left, and homeowner Diane Ferrell, right, sort through mud-caked belongings at Ferrell's flooded home in Loveland, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. The Big Thompson River went over its banks destroying homes and businesses in the area. As floodwaters recede, cleanup and damage assessment continues after historic flooding. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 A car sits in mud and water in front of Gods Country Cowboy Church in Loveland, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. As floodwaters recede, cleanup and damage assessment continues after historic flooding. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Kay DykesOwner Kay Dykes cleans mud-caked merchandise from Canyon Collectibles in Loveland, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. The store was flooded after the Big Thompson River went over its banks. She said she will not reopen the shop. As floodwaters recede, cleanup and damage assessment continues after historic flooding. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Roy PooleRoy Poole goes through mud-caked belongings at a home in Loveland, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. The Big Thompson River went over its banks destroying homes and businesses in the area. As floodwaters recede, cleanup and damage assessment continues after historic flooding.(AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Austin Hix, Emille Young,Austin Hix, center, and Emille Young, right, load destroyed belongings into a truck in Loveland, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. The Big Thompson River went over its banks destroying homes and businesses in the area. As floodwaters recede, cleanup and damage assessment continues after historic flooding. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 A mud-caked doll lies on the floor Canyon Collectibles in Loveland, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. The store was flooded after the Big Thompson River went over its banks. As floodwaters recede, cleanup and damage assessment continues after historic flooding. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Bob PaetzelBob Paetzel cleans mud out of Canyon Collectibles in Loveland, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. The store was flooded after the Big Thompson River went over its banks. As floodwaters recede, cleanup and damage assessment continues after historic flooding. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Bob PaetzelBob Paetzel cleans water and mud out of Canyon Collectibles in Loveland, Colo., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. The store was flooded after the Big Thompson River went over its banks. As floodwaters recede, cleanup and damage assessment continues after historic flooding. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 Mud from flooding is shown covering the main street Sunday Sept. 15, 2013 in Estes Prk, Colo., after water and debris swamped the town when the Big Thompson River surged through Estes Park late Thursday and early Friday. In Estes Park, some 20 miles from Lyons, hundreds of homes and cabins were empty in the town that is a gateway to Rocky Mountain National Park. High water still covered several low-lying streets. Where the river had receded, it had left behind up to a foot of mud. (AP Photo/Jeri Clausing)

 Loaders scrape up mud Sunday Sept. 15, 2013, from the flooding that swept through Estes Park, Colo., that swamped the town's main street when the Big Thompson River surged through Estes Park late Thursday and early Friday. (AP Photo/Jeri Clausing)

FloodFlood Damage in Salina on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013 in the Fourmile Canyon area of Boulder County Colorado. (AP Photo/Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso)

FloodA home is destroyed in Salina on Tuesday, Sept. 17, in the Fourmile Canyon area of Boulder County Colorado. (AP Photo/Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso)

FloodJestin Franklin pushes a wheelbarrow full of mud while helping his grandmother clean flood damage at her home on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013 in the Fourmile Canyon area of Boulder County Colorado. (AP Photo/Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso)

FloodA home is destroyed in Salina on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013 in the Fourmile Canyon area of Boulder County Colorado. (AP Photo/Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso)

FloodKeenan Gates walks across a makeshift bridge in Salina after assessing the damage to his mothers home on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013 at the Salina Junction in the Fourmile Canyon area of Boulder County Colorado. (AP Photo/Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso)

FloodSections of flood damaged road on Fourmile Canyon Drive on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013 in Boulder County Colorado. (AP Photo/Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso)

FloodAmerican Humane Association worker Josh Daniels searches for a missing cat at a home destroyed by the flood in Salina Colorado on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013 on Fourmile Canyon Drive in Boulder County. (AP Photo/Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso)

FloodKeenan Gates, at left, and Caleb Edelman, of ECOS Environmental and Disaster Restoration, assess the destroyed home of Gates mother on Tuesday, Sept. 17, in the town of Salina on Fourmile Canyon Drive in Boulder County. (AP Photo/Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso)

FloodSections of flood a damaged road on Fourmile Canyon Drive on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013 in Boulder County. Initial assessments have begun trickling in, but many areas remain inaccessible and the continuing emergency prevents a thorough understanding of the devastation's scope. (AP Photo/Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso)

 A flooded cornfield near Crook, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The floods that ravaged Colorado this past week also took a toll on the state's agricultural communities. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 In this video still taken Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013, farmer Ron Kline surveys the damage on his property in Johnstown, Colo., following damage from a flood. The surging waters damaged a handful of homes and farmland in this small town. The floods that ravaged Colorado this past week also took a toll on the state's agricultural communities. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)

 A farm is surrounded by floodwaters near Crook, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The floods that ravaged Colorado this past week also took a toll on the state's agricultural communities.. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 FILE - In this Sept. 13, 2013 file photo, cattle find dry ground near Fort Collins, Colo., as flooding continues to devastate the Front Range and thousands are forced to evacuate with an unconfirmed number of structures destroyed. The floods that ravaged Colorado this past week also took a toll on the state's agricultural communities. (AP Photo/Colorado Heli-Ops, Dennis Pierce) MANDATORY CREDIT

 A highway, submerged and broken, winds through a flooded plain near the South Platte River, east of Greeley, Colo., Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. Since last week's devastating floods, state and local transportation officials are tallying the washed-out roads, collapsed bridges and twisted railroad lines. The rebuilding effort will cost hundreds of millions of dollars and take months, if not years. (AP Photo/John Wark)

 Victims of last week's devastating floods retrieve belongings outside a home near the East Platte River east of Greeley, Colo., Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The area's broad agricultural flatlands were especially hard hit by the high water. (AP Photo/John Wark)

 A home leans into flood waters that have destroyed a section of U.S. Highway 34, top, near Greeley, Colo., Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The surrounding area was especially affected by recent flooding, with more than 400 lane-miles of state highway and more than 30 bridges destroyed or impassable. (AP Photo/John Wark)

 The sun sets over a flooded field near Crook, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The emergency airlifts of flood victims waned Tuesday, leaving rescue crews to systematically search the nooks and crannies of the northern Colorado foothills and transportation officials to gauge what it will take to rebuild the wasted landscape. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 The sun sets over a flooded field near Crook, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. Waters are winding their way through rivers and causing flooding further downstream. The emergency airlifts of flood victims waned Tuesday, leaving rescue crews to systematically search the nooks and crannies of the northern Colorado foothills and transportation officials to gauge what it will take to rebuild the wasted landscape. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 An abandoned car lies in the mud off a road destroyed by flood waters along the South Platte River east of Greeley, Colo, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. Northern Colorado's broad agricultural expanses are especially affected, with more than 400 lane-miles of state highway and more than 30 bridges destroyed or impassable. (AP Photo/John Wark)

Trenton MaysTrenton Mays, 15, gathers belongings from his uncle's flooded trailer in Evans, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The emergency airlifts of flood victims waned Tuesday, leaving rescue crews to systematically search the nooks and crannies of the northern Colorado foothills and transportation officials to gauge what it will take to rebuild the wasted landscape. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Rescued Flood VictimsA Blackhawk helicopter is flies over a canyon during a helicopter search of the area around Boulder, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The Office of Emergency Management says that the weather is expected to be clear enough to allow helicopters to take to the skies to rescue flood victims. (AP Photo/Denver Post,Joe Amon, POOL)

 In this aerial photo, vehicles sit amongst the rubble in Lyons, Colo. which was hard hit by flooding in recent days, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013, as seen from a rescue helicopter flown by the 2-4 GSAB 4th Infantry Division based in Ft. Carson. The emergency airlifts of flood victims waned Tuesday, leaving rescue crews to systematically search the nooks and crannies of the northern Colorado foothills and transportation officials to gauge what it will take to rebuild the wasted landscape. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Mark Leffingwell, Pool)

 SFC Keith Bart, right, helps a woman who was rescued from her home by helicopter near Jamestown, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The emergency airlifts of flood victims waned Tuesday, leaving rescue crews to systematically search the nooks and crannies of the northern Colorado foothills and transportation officials to gauge what it will take to rebuild the wasted landscape. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Mark Leffingwell, Pool)

 CORRECTS LAST NAME OF STAFF SGT. TO PANTOJA INSTEAD OF PATOJA - Staff Sgt. Jose Pantoja, with the 2-4 GSAB 4th Infantry Division based in Ft. Carson, looks from the open door of a Blackhawk helicopter for people in need of help near Jamestown, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The Office of Emergency Management says that the weather is expected to be clear enough to allow helicopters to take to the skies to rescue flood victims. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Mark Leffingwell, Pool)

 CORRECTS LAST NAME OF STAFF SGT. TO PANTOJA INSTEAD OF PATOJA - Staff Sgt. Jose Pantoja, right, , with the 2-4 GSAB 4th Infantry Division based in Ft. Carson, checks on two women his crew rescued near Jamestown, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The emergency airlifts of flood victims waned Tuesday, leaving rescue crews to systematically search the nooks and crannies of the northern Colorado foothills and transportation officials to gauge what it will take to rebuild the wasted landscape. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Mark Leffingwell, Pool)

 Staff Sgt. Jose Patoja, with the 2-4 GSAB 4th Infantry Division based in Ft. Carson, waves to people in Left Hand Canyon after they indicated they didn't need help from a Blackhawk helicopter near Jamestown, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The Office of Emergency Management says that the weather is expected to be clear enough to allow helicopters to take to the skies to rescue flood victims. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Mark Leffingwell, Pool)

Reggie LiesveldThis Sept. 16, 2013 photo shows Reggie Liesveld with her 8-month-old dog Delilah at the Boulder, Colo., YMCA, Red Cross shelter for persons displaced by Colorado Flooding. Liesveld was rescued from Pinewood Hills, Colo., one of the towns that was isolated by the flooding in the last week. Her husband who runs a quarry stayed in Pinewood Hills. (AP Photo/Jeri Clausing)

 Two women smile and laugh after being rescued by a helicopter crew with the 2-4 GSAB 4th Infantry Division based in Ft. Carson on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013, near Jamestown, Colo., The emergency airlifts of flood victims waned Tuesday, leaving rescue crews to systematically search the nooks and crannies of the northern Colorado foothills and transportation officials to gauge what it will take to rebuild the wasted landscape. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Mark Leffingwell, Pool)

 Two women are rescued by a helicopter crew with the 2-4 GSAB 4th Infantry Division based in Ft. Carson near Jamestown, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The Office of Emergency Management says that the weather is expected to be clear enough to allow helicopters to take to the skies to rescue flood victims. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Mark Leffingwell, Pool)

Trenton Mays, Kathryn Reeves, Dale ReevesTrenton Mays, 15, left, Kathryn Reeves, 32, center, and Dale Reeves, 54, right, tow an inflatable boat full of family possessions from their relatives flooded trailer in Evans, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. Evacuees are returning to their ravaged communities finding that many of their belongings have been destroyed. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Ruben RoqueRuben Roque wades through floodwaters to pick up family possessions in Evans, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. Many residents left behind their most prized possessions as they fled from the flood waters. Lives are more important than objects. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Rescued Flood VictimsTwo women are hoisted into a Blackhawk helicopter as they are rescued near Jamestown, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013 during a helicopter search of the area devastated by flooding in the state. The Office of Emergency Management says that the weather is expected to be clear enough to allow helicopters to take to the skies to rescue flood victims. (AP Photo/Denver Post,Joe Amon, POOL)

Kathryn ReevesKathryn Reeves, 32, tows an inflatable boat full of family possessions from her god-parents' flooded trailer in Evans, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. Evacuees are returning to their ravaged communities and some are finding that their belongings have been destroyed. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 A flooded trailer park is seen in Evans, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. Evacuees are returning to their ravaged communities and are finding that their belongings have been destroyed. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 A Blackhawk helicopter rescues people in need of help in Lyons, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The Office of Emergency Management says that the weather is expected to be clear enough to allow helicopters to take to the skies to rescue flood victims. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Mark Leffingwell, Pool)

BOULDER FLOODINGA Blackhawk helicopter rescues people in need of help in Lyons, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The Office of Emergency Management says that the weather is expected to be clear enough to allow helicopters to take to the skies to rescue flood victims. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Mark Leffingwell, Pool)

Rescued Flood VictimsTwo women rescued during a helicopter search of the area around Boulder, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013, arrive at the Boulder Municipal Airport. The Office of Emergency Management says that the weather is expected to be clear enough to allow helicopters to take to the skies to rescue flood victims. (AP Photo/Denver Post,Joe Amon, POOL)

Kathryn ReevesKathryn Reeves, 32, holds a family bible from her god-parents flooded trailer in Evans, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. Evacuees are returning to their ravaged communities and some are finding that their belongings have been destroyed. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Kathryn ReevesKathryn Reeves, 32, tows an inflatable boat full of family possessions from her god-parents' flooded trailer in Evans, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. Evacuees are returning to their ravaged communities and some are finding that their belongings have been destroyed. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Mike ParachiniMike Parachini carries supplies to his home that was flooded in Evans, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. Evacuees are returning to their ravaged communities and some are finding that their belongings have been destroyed. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 Members of FEMA Urban Search and Rescue Nebraska Task Force 1 look for missing people in a residential area now surrounded by floodwaters, west of Longmont, Colo., Tuesday Sept. 17, 2013. Searches continue for those missing in isolated Colorado towns. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 A member of FEMA Urban Search and Rescue Nebraska Task Force 1 looks for missing people in a residential area now surrounded by floodwaters, west of Longmont, Colo., Tuesday Sept. 17, 2013. Searches continue for those missing in isolated Colorado towns. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Rescued Flood VictimsA road is washed out by flooding during a helicopter search of the area around Boulder, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The Office of Emergency Management says that the weather is expected to be clear enough to allow helicopters to take to the skies to rescue flood victims. (AP Photo/Denver Post,Joe Amon, POOL)

Rescued Flood VictimsA Blackhawk helicopter is flies over a canyon during a helicopter search of the area around Boulder, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The Office of Emergency Management says that the weather is expected to be clear enough to allow helicopters to take to the skies to rescue flood victims. (AP Photo/Denver Post,Joe Amon, POOL)

Rescued Flood VictimsHeavy equipment works on a road damaged by flooding during a helicopter search of the area around Boulder, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The Office of Emergency Management says that the weather is expected to be clear enough to allow helicopters to take to the skies to rescue flood victims. (AP Photo/Denver Post,Joe Amon, POOL)

Rescued Flood VictimsBuildings are surrounded by flood water during a helicopter search of the area around Boulder, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The Office of Emergency Management says that the weather is expected to be clear enough to allow helicopters to take to the skies to rescue flood victims. (AP Photo/Denver Post,Joe Amon, POOL)

 Members of FEMA Urban Search and Rescue Nebraska Task Force 1 brace each other as they cross floodwaters looking for missing people in a residential area now surrounded by water, west of Longmont, Colo., Tuesday Sept. 17, 2013. Searches continue for those missing in isolated Colorado towns. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Members of FEMA Urban Search and Rescue Nebraska Task Force 1 suit up to cross floodwaters looking for missing people in a residential area now surrounded by water, west of Longmont, Colo., Tuesday Sept. 17, 2013. Searches continue for those missing in isolated Colorado towns. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Members of FEMA Urban Search and Rescue Nebraska Task Force 1 use probes to test for water depth, which in some places is as much as six feet, preparing to cross floodwaters looking for missing people in a residential area now surrounded by water, west of Longmont, Colo., Tuesday Sept. 17, 2013. Searches continue for those missing in isolated Colorado towns. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Staff Sgt. Jose Patoja, right, , with the 2-4 GSAB 4th Infantry Division based in Ft. Carson, checks on two women his crew rescued near Jamestown, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The Office of Emergency Management says that the weather is expected to be clear enough to allow helicopters to take to the skies to rescue flood victims. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Mark Leffingwell, Pool)

Rescued Flood VictimsTwo women are hoisted into a Blackhawk helicopter as they are rescued near Jamestown, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013 during a helicopter search of the area devastated by flooding in the state. The Office of Emergency Management says that the weather is expected to be clear enough to allow helicopters to take to the skies to rescue flood victims. (AP Photo/Denver Post,Joe Amon, POOL)

Rescued Flood VictimsTwo women are hoisted into a Blackhawk helicopter as they are rescued near Jamestown, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013 during a helicopter search of the area devastated by flooding in the state. The Office of Emergency Management says that the weather is expected to be clear enough to allow helicopters to take to the skies to rescue flood victims. (AP Photo/Denver Post,Joe Amon, POOL)

 A woman is hoisted into a Blackhawk helicopter as they are rescued near Jamestown, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013 during a helicopter search of the area devastated by flooding in the state. The Office of Emergency Management says that the weather is expected to be clear enough to allow helicopters to take to the skies to rescue flood victims. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Mark Leffingwell, Pool)

 Two women are rescued by a helicopter crew with the 2-4 GSAB 4th Infantry Division based in Ft. Carson near Jamestown, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The Office of Emergency Management says that the weather is expected to be clear enough to allow helicopters to take to the skies to rescue flood victims. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Mark Leffingwell, Pool)

Rescued Flood VictimsTwo FEMA personnel are lifted into a Blackhawk helicopter during a helicopter search of the area around Boulder, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The Office of Emergency Management says that the weather is expected to be clear enough to allow helicopters to take to the skies to rescue flood victims. (AP Photo/Denver Post,Joe Amon, POOL)

Rescued Flood VictimsA FEMA search team crosses floodwaters in Crestview Estates in Boulder,Colo., as they search the area for missing people on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. Colorado rescue crews said Tuesday that emergency calls were dropping after they rescued hundreds more people stranded by floodwaters. (AP Photo/Jeri Clausing)

Rescued Flood VictimsTwo women are helped as they get off of a military helicopter at the Boulder Municipal Airport in Boulder, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013, after being rescued. Thousands of people remained stranded by high water and washed out roads in the state.(AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

ChinookSoldiers do maintenance work on a Chinook helicopter at the Boulder Municipal Airport in Boulder, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013, where rescue operations are being handled for those stranded from flooding. The rains finally stopped, allowing many Colorado flood evacuees to return home to toppled houses and upended vehicles with the realization that rebuilding their lives will take months. Search crews, meanwhile, rescued hundreds more people stranded by floodwaters. ((AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

 A military medevac helicopter flies a mission near Boulder, Colo., Tuesday Sept. 17, 2013. The rains finally stopped, allowing many Colorado flood evacuees to return home to toppled houses and upended vehicles with the realization that rebuilding their lives will take months. Search crews, meanwhile, rescued hundreds more people stranded by floodwaters. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 A cow walks through flooded fields outside Longmont, Colo., Tuesday Sept. 17, 2013. The rains finally stopped, allowing many Colorado flood evacuees to return home to toppled houses and upended vehicles with the realization that rebuilding their lives will take months. Search crews, meanwhile, rescued hundreds more people stranded by floodwaters. . (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)



 Muddied furniture sits in Terri Jo and Jeff Cast's basement in Johnstown, Colo. on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013 after damage from a flood. The surging waters damaged the rental home as well as the the neighboring farmland. The floods that ravaged Colorado this past week also took a toll on the state's agricultural communities. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)

 The roof of a collapsed barn rests on muddy ground at a farm in Johnstown, Colo. on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013 following damage from a flood. The surging waters damaged a handful of homes and farmland in this small town. The floods that ravaged Colorado this past week also took a toll on the state's agricultural communities. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)

 Mud and water cover what used to be an asphalt driveway at a farm in Johnstown, Colo. on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013 following damage from a flood. The surging waters damaged a handful of homes and farmland in this small town. The floods that ravaged Colorado this past week also took a toll on the state's agricultural communities. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)

 Kenny O'Gorman and Delfino Ortega help clean up Terri Jo and Jeff Cast's basement in Johnstown, Colo. on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013 following damage from a flood. The surging waters also damaged the neighboring farmland. The floods that ravaged Colorado this past week also took a toll on the state's agricultural communities. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)

Nancy Cousins, John CousinsNancy Cousins, left, cleans furniture while her husband John Cousins, right, carries possessions out their flooded basement in Longmont, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The rains finally stopped, allowing many Colorado flood evacuees to return home to toppled houses and upended vehicles with the realization that rebuilding their lives will take months. Search crews, meanwhile, rescued hundreds more people stranded by floodwaters. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Cody Trevithick, Daniel GurrolaCity of Longmont workers Cody Trevithick, left, and Daniel Gurrola, right, clean mud and debris from Airport Rd. in Longmont, Colo., on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013. The rains finally stopped, allowing many Colorado flood evacuees to return home to toppled houses and upended vehicles with the realization that rebuilding their lives will take months. Search crews, meanwhile, rescued hundreds more people stranded by floodwaters. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 At sunrise, the St. Vrain creek flows past a bridge destroyed in flooding days earlier, in Longmont, Colo., Tuesday Sept. 17, 2013. Meanwhile elsewhere, searches continue for those missing in isolated Colorado mountain towns. The rains finally stopped, allowing many Colorado flood evacuees to return home to toppled houses and upended vehicles with the realization that rebuilding their lives will take months. Search crews, meanwhile, rescued hundreds more people stranded by floodwaters. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Chris Ringdahl, Katherine MacIntoshHomeowner Chris Ringdahl, left, is comforted by family friend Katherine MacIntosh, right, in front of her possessions as they cleanup from the floodwaters in Longmont, Colo., on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013. Floodwaters have affected a 4,500 square-mile section of the state inundating entire neighborhoods and destroying bridges and roads. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 FILE - In this Sept. 13, 2013 file photo, cars lay mired in mud deposited by floods in Lyons, Colo. Little more than a year after Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper assured the world his wildfire-ravaged state was still “open for business,” he may have to throw another lifeline to keep the state’s billion-dollar tourism industry afloat. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

Jose PantoiaThis photo released by the U.S. Army, Staff Sgt. Jose Pantoja, a flight medic with the Colorado Air National Guard, carries an unidentified evacuee up a hoist onto a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter during flood rescue and recovery operations near Boulder, Colo., Monday, Sept. 16, 2013. Military helicopter crews have flown hundreds of missions up the treacherous canyons of the Rocky Mountains to rescue about 2,000 people, and counting, and drop food and water supplies to stranded hamlets. (AP Photo/U.S. Army, Sgt. Jonathan C. Thibault/Released)

 Cars moved around by floodwaters are piled up in Longmont, Colo., on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013. Floodwaters have affected a 4,500 square-mile section of the state inundating entire neighborhoods and destroying bridges and roads. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Saikham XiongSaikham Xiong, 22, cleans mud from a business in Longmont, Colo., on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013. Floodwaters have affected a 4,500 square-mile section of the state inundating entire neighborhoods and destroying bridges and roads. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 A building is surrounded by floodwaters in Loveland, Colo., on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013. Floodwaters have affected a 4,500 square-mile section of the state inundating entire neighborhoods and destroying bridges and roads. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 A pickup truck lies in floodwaters in Longmont, Colo., on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013. Floodwaters have affected a 4,500 square-mile section of the state inundating entire neighborhoods and destroying bridges and roads. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 Floodwaters inundate a street in Loveland, Colo., on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013. Floodwaters have affected a 4,500 square-mile section of the state inundating entire neighborhoods and destroying bridges and roads. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Rescued Flood VictimsA woman is helped off of a military helicopter at the Boulder Municipal Airport in Boulder, Colo., on on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013, after being rescued. Thousands of people remained stranded by high water and washed out roads in the state. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

Rescued Flood VictimsA flood victim walks off of a military helicopter at the Boulder Municipal Airport in Boulder, Colo., on on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013, after being rescued. Thousands of people remained stranded by high water and washed out roads in the state.(AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

Rescued Flood VictimsFlood victims are helped off of a military helicopter at the Boulder Municipal Airport in Boulder, Colo., on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013, after being rescued. Thousands of people remained stranded by high water and washed out roads in the state.(AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

Rescued Flood VictimsA woman is helped off of a military helicopter at the Boulder Municipal Airport in Boulder, Colo., on on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013, after being rescued. Thousands of people remained stranded by high water and washed out roads in the state.(AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

Rescued Flood VictimsFlood victims are helped off of military helicopters at the Boulder Municipal Airport in Boulder, Colo., on on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013, after being rescued. Thousands of people remained stranded by high water and washed out roads in the state.(AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

Rescue HelicoptersA military helicopter takes off from Boulder Municipal Airport as another, in foreground, warms up to fly in Boulder, Colo., on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013. Crews are searching for pockets of individuals still stranded from flooding that began late last week. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

 Miranda Woodard, left, and Joey Schendel help salvage and clean property in an area inundated after days of flooding, in Hygiene, Colo., Monday Sept. 16, 2013. Colorado mountain towns cut off for days by massive flooding slowly reopened Monday, to reveal cabins toppled, homes ripped from their foundations and everything covered in a thick layer of muck. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Local residents, left to right, Genevieve Marquez and Miranda Woodard rinse mud from their hands in floodwaters while helping salvage and clean property in an area inundated after days of flooding, in Hygeine, Colo., Monday Sept. 16, 2013. Searches continue for missing people in isolated Colorado mountain towns. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Local residents, left to right, Levi Wolfe, Miranda Woodard, Tyler Sadar, and Genevieve Marquez help salvage and clean property in an area inundated after days of flooding, in Hygeine, Colo., Monday Sept. 16, 2013. Searches continue for missing people in isolated Colorado mountain towns. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Local residents, left to right, Tyler Sadar, Miranda Woodard, Joey Schendel, and Levi Wolfe help salvage and clean property in an area inundated after days of flooding, in Hygeine, Colo., Monday Sept. 16, 2013. Searches continue for missing people in isolated Colorado mountain towns. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Local man Joey Schendel, 19, looks for submerged items while helping neighbors salvage and clean their property in an area inundated after days of flooding, in Hygeine, Colo., Monday Sept. 16, 2013. Searches continue for missing people in isolated Colorado mountain towns. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 A bulldozer drives on the sidewalk past Boulder Creek, whose swollen waters have receded somewhat since the intense rain has abated over the past two days, in Boulder, Colo., Sunday Sept. 15, 2013. The National Weather Service says up to 2 inches of rain could fall Sunday, creating a risk of more flooding and mudslides. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Dawn breaks over Boulder, Colo., where the intense rain which had fallen for days has abated somewhat over the past two days, on Sunday Sept. 15, 2013. Helicopter crews are planning to expand their searches Sunday for people stranded by flooding in Colorado. But those plans could be hampered by more rain. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 As heavy rains return after somewhat abating for two days, a field fills with water from overflowing creeks nearby, outside Longmont, Colo., Sunday Sept. 15, 2013. The National Weather Service says up to 2 inches of rain could fall Sunday, creating a risk of more flooding and mudslides. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 As heavy rains return after somewhat abating for two days, a field fills with water from overflowing creeks nearby, outside Longmont, Colo., Sunday Sept. 15, 2013. The National Weather Service says up to 2 inches of rain could fall Sunday, creating a risk of more flooding and mudslides. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Longmont, Colorado FloodingCarlos Duron, 3, and his mother, Vilma Maldonado, are evacuees from Longmont, Colo., staying at Mead High School with the Red Cross on Sunday, Sept. 15, 2013 in Mead, Colo. The National Weather Service says up to 2 inches of rain could fall Sunday, creating a risk of more flooding and mudslides. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Cliff Grassmick) NO SALES

 As heavy rains return after somewhat abating for two days, a farm fills with water from overflowing creeks nearby, outside Longmont, Colo., Sunday Sept. 15, 2013. The National Weather Service says up to 2 inches of rain could fall Sunday, creating a risk of more flooding and mudslides. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Longmont, Colorado FloodingCortney Perez of Lyons, Colo., pets her dog, while one of her birds rests on her shoulder at the LifeBridge Church in Longmont, Colo., on September 15, 2013. The church provides food and shelter for families and pets. The National Weather Service says up to 2 inches of rain could fall Sunday, creating a risk of more flooding and mudslides. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Cliff Grassmick) NO SALES

 A building housing farm equipment is underwater from flooding on the South Platte River on a farm near Greeley, Colo., on Sunday, Sept. 15, 2013. Heavy rains continued on Sunday. Broad swaths of farmland have become lakes, as the raging South Platte and Poudre rivers flood the area. AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

FLOODING DAY FOURDan Feldheim, left, Scott Hoffenberg, center, and John Smart, pass sandbags as residents reinforce the dam on University Hill in Boulder, Colo., on Sunday, Sept. 15, 2013. The National Weather Service says up to 2 inches of rain could fall Sunday, creating a risk of more flooding and mudslides. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Paul Aiken) NO SALES

FLOODING DAY FOURDean Beacom works to save his home from a flash flood near 19th Street and Upland Avenue, Sunday, Sept. 15, 2013, in Boulder, Colo. The National Weather Service says up to 2 inches of rain could fall Sunday, creating a risk of more flooding and mudslides. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso) NO SALES

FLOODING DAY FOURA home on Upland Avenue is inundated by a flash flood on Sunday, Sept. 15, 2013, in Boulder, Colo. The National Weather Service says up to 2 inches of rain could fall Sunday, creating a risk of more flooding and mudslides. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso) NO SALES

LyonsThis photo taken on Friday, Sept. 13, 2013, shows cleanup of damage from flooding underway in Lyons, Colo. Access to the small mountain town was cut off after bridges were destroyed by flash flooding. Days of rain and floods have transformed the outdoorsy mountain communities in Colorado's Rocky Mountain foothills from a paradise for backpackers and nature lovers into a disaster area with little in the way of supplies or services. Roadways have crumbled, scenic bridges are destroyed, and most shops are closed.(AP Photo/Kenneth Wajda)

LyonsThis photo taken on Friday, Sept. 13, 2013, shows National Guardsmen loading a woman into a truck to be evacuated from Lyons, Colo. Access to the small mountain town was cut off after bridges were destroyed by flash flooding. Days of rain and floods have transformed the outdoorsy mountain communities in Colorado's Rocky Mountain foothills from a paradise for backpackers and nature lovers into a disaster area with little in the way of supplies or services. Roadways have crumbled, scenic bridges are destroyed, and most shops are closed.(AP Photo/Kenneth Wajda)

LyonsThis photo taken on Friday, Sept. 13, 2013, shows vehicles damages by flood waters on a street in Lyons, Colo. Access to the small mountain town was cut off after bridges were destroyed by flash flooding. Days of rain and floods have transformed the outdoorsy mountain communities in Colorado's Rocky Mountain foothills from a paradise for backpackers and nature lovers into a disaster area with little in the way of supplies or services. Roadways have crumbled, scenic bridges are destroyed, and most shops are closed.(AP Photo/Kenneth Wajda)

LyonsThis photo taken on Friday, Sept. 13, 2013, a National Guard soldier carrying bread into Lyons, Colo. Access to the small mountain town was cut off after bridges were destroyed by flash flooding. Days of rain and floods have transformed the outdoorsy mountain communities in Colorado's Rocky Mountain foothills from a paradise for backpackers and nature lovers into a disaster area with little in the way of supplies or services. Roadways have crumbled, scenic bridges are destroyed, and most shops are closed.(AP Photo/Kenneth Wajda)

LyonsThis photo taken on Friday, Sept. 13, 2013, shows the foundation of a house being undercut in Lyons, Colo. Access to the small mountain town was cut off after bridges were destroyed by flash flooding. Days of rain and floods have transformed the outdoorsy mountain communities in Colorado's Rocky Mountain foothills from a paradise for backpackers and nature lovers into a disaster area with little in the way of supplies or services. Roadways have crumbled, scenic bridges are destroyed, and most shops are closed.(AP Photo/Kenneth Wajda)

LyonsThis photo taken on Friday, Sept. 13, 2013, shows National Guard trucks making their way down one of the main streets in Lyons, Colo. Access to the small mountain town was cut off after bridges were destroyed by flash flooding. Days of rain and floods have transformed the outdoorsy mountain communities in Colorado's Rocky Mountain foothills from a paradise for backpackers and nature lovers into a disaster area with little in the way of supplies or services. Roadways have crumbled, scenic bridges are destroyed, and most shops are closed.(AP Photo/Kenneth Wajda)

LyonsThis photo taken on Friday, Sept. 13, 2013, shows two men carrying bottled water down a street in Lyons, Colo. Access to the small mountain town was cut off after bridges were destroyed by flash flooding. Days of rain and floods have transformed the outdoorsy mountain communities in Colorado's Rocky Mountain foothills from a paradise for backpackers and nature lovers into a disaster area with little in the way of supplies or services. Roadways have crumbled, scenic bridges are destroyed, and most shops are closed.(AP Photo/Kenneth Wajda)

 Water flows through an evacuated neighborhood after days of flooding in Hygeine, Colo., Sunday Sept. 15, 2013. After somewhat abating for two days, rain returned to Colorado Sunday, creating a risk of more flooding and mudslides. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Water flows through an evacuated neighborhood after days of flooding in Hygeine, Colo., Sunday Sept. 15, 2013. After somewhat abating for two days, rain returned to Colorado Sunday, creating a risk of more flooding and mudslides. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Water flows through an evacuated neighborhood after days of flooding in Hygeine, Colo., Sunday Sept. 15, 2013. After somewhat abating for two days, rain returned to Colorado Sunday, creating a risk of more flooding and mudslides. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Water flows through an evacuated neighborhood after days of flooding in Hygeine, Colo., Sunday Sept. 15, 2013. After somewhat abating for two days, rain returned to Colorado Sunday, creating a risk of more flooding and mudslides. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 A flooded house bears a dark muddy line showing the high water mark from the flood's peak, in an evacuated neighborhood in Hygeine, Colo., Sunday Sept. 15, 2013. After somewhat abating for two days, rain returned to Colorado Sunday, creating a risk of more flooding and mudslides. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 A local woman walks in an evacuated neighborhood where many homes are inundated with water from overflowing canals after days of flash floods and intense rain, in Hygeine, Colo., Sunday Sept. 15, 2013. After somewhat abating for two days, rain returned to Colorado Sunday, creating a risk of more flooding and mudslides. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Amy HamrickCoffee shop owner Amy Hamrick poses in her shop Sunday Sept. 15, 2013 in Estes Park, Colo. Hamrick worked to clear inventory and clean up mud and water that swamped the town's main street when the Big Thompson River surged through Estes Park late Thursday and early Friday. (AP Photo/Jeri Clausing)

 Mud from flooding is shown covering the main street Sunday Sept. 15, 2013 in Estes Prk, Colo., after water and debris swamped the town when the Big Thompson River surged through Estes Park late Thursday and early Friday. In Estes Park, some 20 miles from Lyons, hundreds of homes and cabins were empty in the town that is a gateway to Rocky Mountain National Park. High water still covered several low-lying streets. Where the river had receded, it had left behind up to a foot of mud. (AP Photo/Jeri Clausing)

 Loaders scrape up mud Sunday Sept. 15, 2013, from the flooding that swept through Estes Park, Colo., that swamped the town's main street when the Big Thompson River surged through Estes Park late Thursday and early Friday. (AP Photo/Jeri Clausing)

FLOODING DAY FOURGranger Banks and Suzie Banks walk between discarded and drying household items from a damaged house on Upland Ave in Boulder, Colo., on Sunday, Sept. 15, 2013. Rain fell heavily Sunday, increasing fears of more flooding in the community. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Paul Aiken) NO SALES

 A mudslide along the side of the highway leading into the mountain town of Estes Park, Colo., is shown Sunday, Sept. 15, 2013. Estes Park town administrator Frank Lancaster said visitors who would normally flock there during the golden September days should stay away for at least a month, but it could take a year or longer for many of the mountain roadways to be repaired.(AP Photo/Jeri Clausing)

 A boat carrying residents back to their homes to gather pets and belongings goes past a muddy U.S. flag in a residential neighborhood in Longmont, Colo., on Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013. Floodwaters have affected a 4,500 square-mile section of the state. National Guard helicopters have been evacuating residents from the hardest hit communities. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 A muddy U.S. flag stands in front of flooded homes in Longmont, Colo., on Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013. Floodwaters have affected a 4,500 square-mile section of the state. National Guard helicopters have been evacuating residents from the hardest hit communities. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Eric Machmuller, Brian Winn, Mitch Machmuller, Pat MachmullerEric Machmuller, front left, Brian Winn, rear left, Mitch Machmuller, rear right, and Pat Machmuller, front right, steer a boat down a residential street to help residents gather pets and belongings from their flooded homes in Longmont, Colo., on Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013. Floodwaters have affected a 4,500 square-mile section of the state. National Guard helicopters have been evacuating residents from the hardest hit communities. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Brian Winn, Mitch Machmuller, Eric Machmuller, Pat MachmullerBrian Winn, rear left, Mitch Machmuller, rear center, Eric Machmuller, front center, and Pat Machmuller, right, steer a boat down a residential street to help residents gather pets and belongings from their flooded homes in Longmont, Colo., on Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013. Floodwaters have affected a 4,500 square-mile section of the state. National Guard helicopters have been evacuating residents from the hardest hit communities. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 Farm buildings stand in fields submerged by flooding along the South Platte River in Weld County, Colo., near Greeley, Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013. The days-long rush of water from higher ground turned parts of Colorado's expansive eastern plains into muddy swamps. (AP Photo/John Wark)

Kathy BellKathy Bell, 58, walks through a stream running through a neighbor's yard to get possessions from her home in Longmont, Colo., on Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013. Floodwaters have affected a 4,500 square-mile section of the state. National Guard helicopters have been evacuating residents from the hardest hit communities. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

John Hickenlooper, Jared Polis, Michael Bennet, Mark Udall, Ed PerlmutterColorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, second from left, walks with, left to right, Rep. Jared Polis, D-Colo., Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., Sen. Mark Udall, D-Colo., and, second from right, Rep. Ed Perlmutter, D-Colo., after touring flood-damaged areas by army helicopter, at Boulder Municipal Airport, Colo., Saturday Sept. 14, 2013. By air and by land, the rescue of hundreds of Coloradoans stranded by epic mountain flooding was accelerating as food and water supplies ran low, while thousands more were driven from their homes on the plains as debris-filled rivers became muddy seas inundating towns and farms miles from the Rockies. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Krsitin McDonald, Stanley McDonaldKrsitin McDonald, right, dries out family photos while her husband Stanley McDonald, left, wipes his brow after their basement flooded in Longmont, Colo., on Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013. Floodwaters have affected a 4,500 square-mile section of the state. National Guard helicopters have been evacuating residents from the hardest hit communities. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

Kyle McDonaldKyle McDonald, 20, dumps buckets of water from the basement of his home into the street in Longmont, Colo., on Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013. Floodwaters have affected a 4,500 square-mile section of the state. National Guard helicopters have been evacuating residents from the hardest hit communities. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 People stand at the edge of a highway washed out by flooding along the South Platte River in Weld County, Colorado near Greeley, Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013. Hundreds of roads in the area have been damaged or destroyed by the floodwaters that have affected parts of a 4,500-square-mile area. (AP Photo/John Wark)

Eric Machmuller, Pat MachmullerEric Machmuller, front left, and Pat Machmuller, rear left, lead a boat down a residential street to help residents gather pets and belongings from their flooded homes in Longmont, Colo., on Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013. Floodwaters have affected a 4,500 square-mile section of the state. National Guard helicopters have been evacuating residents from the hardest hit communities. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 A resident sits in her front door and looks at flood waters in Longmont, Colo., on Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013. Floodwaters have affected a 4,500 square-mile section of the state. National Guard helicopters have been evacuating residents from the hardest hit communities. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 A group of trailers are smashed together at a storage site near Greeley, Colo., Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, as debris-filled rivers flooded into towns and farms miles from the Rockies. Hundreds of roads, farms and businesses in the area have been damaged or destroyed by the floodwaters. (AP Photo/John Wark)

 A resident watches a boat float down the center of the street in Longmont, Colo., on Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013. Floodwaters have affected a 4,500 square-mile section of the state. National Guard helicopters have been evacuating residents from the hardest hit communities. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

 A section of highway is washed out by flooding along the South Platte River in Weld County, Colorado near Greeley, Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013. Hundreds of roads in the area have been damaged or destroyed by the floodwaters that have affected parts of a 4,500-square-mile (11,655-square-kilometer) area — an area the size of the U.S. state of Connecticut. (AP Photo/John Wark)

 A field of parked cars and trucks sits partially submerged near Greeley, Colo., Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, as debris-filled rivers flooded into towns and farms miles from the Rockies. Hundreds of roads, farms and businesses in the area have been damaged or destroyed by the floodwaters. (AP Photo/John Wark)

 A car is surrounded floodwaters in front of a home in Longmont, Colo., on Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013. Floodwaters have affected a 4,500 square-mile section of the state. National Guard helicopters have been evacuating residents from the hardest hit communities. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

JonathanA boy walks past a flooded home in Longmont, Colo., on Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013. Floodwaters have affected a 4,500 square-mile section of the state. National Guard helicopters have been evacuating residents from the hardest hit communities. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

John Hickenlooper, Michael Bennet, Mark UdallColorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, center, speaks to members of the media, alongside Sen. Mark Udall, D-Colo., left, and Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., after touring flood-damaged areas by army helicopter, at Boulder Municipal Airport, Colo., Saturday Sept. 14, 2013. By air and by land, the rescue of hundreds of Coloradoans stranded by epic mountain flooding was accelerating as food and water supplies ran low, while thousands more were driven from their homes on the plains as debris-filled rivers became muddy seas inundating towns and farms miles from the Rockies. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

BOULDER FLOODINGBonnie Dannelly hugs her daughter Makayla after she got off the bus at Fireside Elementary in Louisville, Colo., Saturday Sept. 14, 2013. Makayla Dannelly was one of over 80 Fireside 5th graders who were trapped above Jamestown at Camp Cal-Wood. (AP Photo/Daily Camera, Mark Leffingwell)

Longmont Flood Damage Day 3Rose Marie Rempel holds an old photo album that has water damage from the flooding on Sept. 14, 2013. She lives in the Champion neighborhood in Longmont, Colo. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Cliff Grassmick )

Longmont Flood Damage Day 3Judy Laursen helps a neighbor load belongings in a car in the Champion Neighborhood in Longmont, Colorado on Sept. 14, 2013. Residents were allowed in for an hour to get belongings on Saturday Sept. 14, 2013. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Cliff Grassmick )

FloodLefthand Canyon Road near the intersection of Olde Stage Road in Boulder, Colo., on Saturday, Sept. 14, in Boulder. Rescuers rushed by land and by air Saturday to evacuate Coloradoans stranded by epic mountain flooding as debris-filled rivers became muddy seas that extended into towns and farms miles from the Rockies. Four people have been confirmed dead since the harrowing floods began Wednesday. And hundreds of others have not been heard from in the flood zone, which has grown to cover an area covering nearly 4,500 square miles (11,655 square kilometers), nearly the size of the U.S. state of Connecticut. (AP Photo/Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso)

Longmont Flood Damage Day 3Railroad tracks running North and South at 9th Street, East of Airport Road, continue to be flooded in Longmont, Colo, on Saturday Sept. 14, 2013. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Cliff Grassmick )

FLOODING DAY THREEJustin Slyter with Par Electrical Contractors looks over fallen power poles in a office complex on Arapahoe Avenue next to Eben G Fine Park in Boulder on Saturday Sept, 14, 2013. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Paul Aiken)

FLOODING DAY THREEFrom left to right Steve Gabel and Patrick Muir move a soaked couch out from Muir's apartment on 7th Street on University Hill in Boulder on Saturday Sept, 14, 2013. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Paul Aiken)

FLOODING DAY THREECassie King looks over Boulder Creek from a bridge in Eben G. Fine Park in Boulder on Saturday Sept, 14, 2013. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Paul Aiken)

FLOODING DAY THREEEvan Russack with his son Trevor, 6, look over Pennsylvania Ave on University Hill which was cut in two by flooding Saturday Sept, 14, 2013. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Paul Aiken)

FLOODING DAY THREEJon Tarkington with his daughter Evy, 1, look over a diversion dam built in the intersection of 7th Street and University Ave on University Hill in Boulder, Colo., Saturday Sept, 14, 2013. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Paul Aiken)

FLOODING DAY THREEJulie Hauser works to shore up a handmade diversion dam on 7th Street on University Hill in Boulder, Colo., on Saturday Sept, 14, 2013. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Paul Aiken)

FloodAnita and Art Powner evacuate with their dogs Zypher and Lexus on Saturday, Sept. 14, on Olde Stage Road in Boulder, Colo. Rescuers rushed by land and by air Saturday to evacuate Coloradoans stranded by epic mountain flooding as debris-filled rivers became muddy seas that extended into towns and farms miles from the Rockies. Four people have been confirmed dead since the harrowing floods began Wednesday. And hundreds of others have not been heard from in the flood zone, which has grown to cover an area covering nearly 4,500 square miles (11,655 square kilometers), nearly the size of the U.S. state of Connecticut. (AP Photo/Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso)

FloodLefthand Canyon Drive is in ruins seen here on Saturday, Sept. 14, on Olde Stage Road in Boulder, Colo. Rescuers rushed by land and by air Saturday to evacuate Coloradoans stranded by epic mountain flooding as debris-filled rivers became muddy seas that extended into towns and farms miles from the Rockies. Four people have been confirmed dead since the harrowing floods began Wednesday. And hundreds of others have not been heard from in the flood zone, which has grown to cover an area covering nearly 4,500 square miles (11,655 square kilometers), nearly the size of the U.S. state of Connecticut. (AP Photo/Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso)

FloodRichard Dash evacuates his home on Saturday, Sept. 14, on Olde Stage Road in Boulder, Colo. Rescuers rushed by land and by air Saturday to evacuate Coloradoans stranded by epic mountain flooding as debris-filled rivers became muddy seas that extended into towns and farms miles from the Rockies. Four people have been confirmed dead since the harrowing floods began Wednesday. And hundreds of others have not been heard from in the flood zone, which has grown to cover an area covering nearly 4,500 square miles (11,655 square kilometers), nearly the size of the U.S. state of Connecticut. (AP Photo/Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso)

FloodPower crews work on resetting lines felled by a mudslide on Olde Stage Road in Boulder, Colo,. Saturday Sept. 14, 2013. Rescuers rushed by land and by air Saturday to evacuate Coloradoans stranded by epic mountain flooding as debris-filled rivers became muddy seas that extended into towns and farms miles from the Rockies. Four people have been confirmed dead since the harrowing floods began Wednesday. And hundreds of others have not been heard from in the flood zone, which has grown to cover an area covering nearly 4,500 square miles (11,655 square kilometers), nearly the size of the U.S. state of Connecticut. (AP Photo/Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso)

FloodBrian Montgomery works to clean up the mud in his mothers flooded basement on Saturday, Sept. 14, on Olde Stage Road in Boulder, Colo,. Rescuers rushed by land and by air Saturday to evacuate Coloradoans stranded by epic mountain flooding as debris-filled rivers became muddy seas that extended into towns and farms miles from the Rockies. Four people have been confirmed dead since the harrowing floods began Wednesday. And hundreds of others have not been heard from in the flood zone, which has grown to cover an area covering nearly 4,500 square miles (11,655 square kilometers), nearly the size of the U.S. state of Connecticut. (AP Photo/Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso)

FloodA woman, who asked not to be identified, carries two children while being evacuated by the Juniper Valley Fire Crew on Saturday, Sept. 14, on Olde Stage Road in Boulder, Colo,. Rescuers rushed by land and by air Saturday to evacuate Coloradoans stranded by epic mountain flooding as debris-filled rivers became muddy seas that extended into towns and farms miles from the Rockies. Four people have been confirmed dead since the harrowing floods began Wednesday. And hundreds of others have not been heard from in the flood zone, which has grown to cover an area covering nearly 4,500 square miles (11,655 square kilometers), nearly the size of the U.S. state of Connecticut. (AP Photo/Daily Camera, Jeremy Papasso)

Will PitnerWill Pitner is rescued by emergency workers after a night trapped sheltering outside on high ground above his home as it filled with water after days of record rain and flooding, at the base of Boulder Canyon, Colo., Friday Sept. 13, 2013 in Boulder. People in Boulder were ordered to evacuate as water rose to dangerous levels amid a storm system that has been dropping rain for a week. Rescuers struggled to reach dozens of people cut off by flooding in mountain communities, while residents in the Denver area and other areas were warned to stay off flooded streets. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Will PitnerWill Pitner is rescued by emergency workers after a night trapped sheltering outside on high ground above his home as it filled with water from the surge of water, after days of record rain and flooding, at the base of Boulder Canyon, Colo., Friday Sept. 13, 2013 in Boulder. People in Boulder were ordered to evacuate as water rose to dangerous levels amid a storm system that has been dropping rain for a week. Rescuers struggled to reach dozens of people cut off by flooding in mountain communities, while residents in the Denver area and other areas were warned to stay off flooded streets. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Will PitnerWill Pitner is rescued by emergency workers, and neighbor Jeff Writer, left, after a night trapped sheltering outside on high ground above his home as it filled with water from a surge of water, after days of record rain and flooding, at the base of Boulder Canyon, Colo., Friday Sept. 13, 2013 in Boulder. Flash flooding in Colorado has left at least three people reportedly dead and the widespread high waters have hampered emergency workers' access to affected communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Utah ParkA duck swims near bleachers at Utah Park on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013, in Aurora, Colo. The park was under water Thursday due to flooding. Flash flooding in Colorado has cut off access to towns, closed the University of Colorado in Boulder and left at least three people dead.(AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

 A man begins cleaning up Canon Avenue in Manitou Springs, Colo. after a flash flood burst through a manhole and sent water rushing down the streets Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013. (AP Photo/The Gazette, Michael Ciaglo) MAGS OUT

Manitou FloodFlood water shoots out of a sewer on Canon Avenue on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013, in Manitou Springs, Colo. Flash flooding in Colorado has cut off access to towns, closed the University of Colorado in Boulder and left at least three people dead. (AP Photo/The Colorado Springs Gazette, Michael Ciaglo)

 Flood water shoots out of a sewer on Canon Avenue next to the Cliff House in Manitou Springs, Colo. Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 as storms continue to dump rain over the Waldo Canyon burn scar. (AP Photo/The Gazette, Michael Ciaglo)

Brian FlynnBrian Flynn, of Oregon, clears a drain in front of his sister's home in Boulder, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013. Flash flooding in Colorado has cut off access to towns, closed the University of Colorado in Boulder and left at least three people dead.(AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

Colorado FloodingA couple plays in flood water at Utah Park in Aurora, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013. The park was under water due to flooding. Flash flooding in Colorado has cut off access to towns, closed the University of Colorado in Boulder and left at least three people dead.(AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

 Boulder Creek roils at high speed after days of record rain and flooding, at the base of Boulder Canyon, Friday Sept. 13, 2013 in Boulder, Colo. People in Boulder were ordered to evacuate as water rose to dangerous levels amid a storm system that has been dropping rain for a week. Rescuers struggled to reach dozens of people cut off by flooding in mountain communities, while residents in the Denver area and other areas were warned to stay off flooded streets. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Water pours off the roof of a house after days of record rain and flooding, at the base of Boulder Canyon, Friday Sept. 13, 2013 in Boulder, Colo. People in Boulder were ordered to evacuate as water rose to dangerous levels amid a storm system that has been dropping rain for a week. Rescuers struggled to reach dozens of people cut off by flooding in mountain communities, while residents in the Denver area and other areas were warned to stay off flooded streets. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)(AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Boulder Creek roils at high speed after days of record rain and flooding, at the base of Boulder Canyon, Colo., Friday Sept. 13, 2013 in Boulder. People in Boulder were ordered to evacuate as water rose to dangerous levels amid a storm system that has been dropping rain for a week. Rescuers struggled to reach dozens of people cut off by flooding in mountain communities, while residents in the Denver area and other areas were warned to stay off flooded streets. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 During a break in the rain, a woman walks over a footbridge past Boulder Creek which roils at high speed after days of record rain and flooding, at the base of Boulder Canyon, Colo., Friday Sept. 13, 2013. People in Boulder were ordered to evacuate as water rose to dangerous levels amid a storm system that has been dropping rain for a week. Rescuers struggled to reach dozens of people cut off by flooding in mountain communities, while residents in the Denver area and other areas were warned to stay off flooded streets. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Boulder Creek flows at high speed next to a road closed off by debris from days of rain and flooding, at the base of Boulder Canyon, Colo., Friday, Sept. 13, 2013. People in Boulder were ordered to evacuate as water rose to dangerous levels amid a storm system that has been dropping rain for a week. Rescuers struggled to reach dozens of people cut off by flooding in mountain communities, while residents in the Denver area and other areas were warned to stay off flooded streets. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Brother and sister Patrick Tinsley and Mary Kerns walk into Boulder, Colo., from their mountain community Magnolia, where road access is shut off by debris from days of record rain and flooding, at the base of Boulder Canyon, Colo., Friday, Sept. 13, 2013. People in Boulder were ordered to evacuate as water rose to dangerous levels amid a storm system that has been dropping rain for a week. Rescuers struggled to reach dozens of people cut off by flooding in mountain communities, while residents in the Denver area and other areas were warned to stay off flooded streets. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Denver skylineA wall of a clouds enshrouds the high-rise buildings of downtown Denver early Friday, Sept. 13, 2013., as heavy rains continue to pummel cities along Colorado's Front Range. Heavy, stationary rainstorms have wreaked havoc on cities and communities along the Front Range and into the foothills since Wednesday with more rain forecasted for the weekend ahead. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

 Mountain View Fire Rescue department firefighters Jamie Wood and Steve Knoll walk through a food of water after doing a welfare check of a flooded property in rural Erie, Colo. on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013. Overnight rains along Colorado's eastern foothills caused flooding in several communities and two fatalities. (AP Photo/Peter M. Fredin)

 This image provided by Jason Stillman, shows flooding in Lyons Colo., Thursday Sept. 12, 2013. Boulder County Sheriff Joe Pelle said the town of Lyons was completely cut off because of flooded roads. Flash flooding in Colorado has cut off access to towns, closed the University of Colorado in Boulder and left at least three people dead. (AP Photo/Jason Stillman)

 A man takes a photograph of the overflowing St. Vrain River following overnight flash flooding, one mile east of Lyons, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. Flash flooding in Colorado has left at least three people reportedly dead and the widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents in Lyons and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 This image provided by Jason Stillman, shows flooding in Lyons Colo., Thursday Sept. 12, 2013. Boulder County Sheriff Joe Pelle said the town of Lyons was completely cut off because of flooded roads. Flash flooding in Colorado has cut off access to towns, closed the University of Colorado in Boulder and left at least three people dead. (AP Photo/Jason Stillman)

 This image provided by Jason Stillman, shows flooding in Lyons Colo., Thursday Sept. 12, 2013. Boulder County Sheriff Joe Pelle said the town of Lyons was completely cut off because of flooded roads. Flash flooding in Colorado has cut off access to towns, closed the University of Colorado in Boulder and left at least three people dead. (AP Photo/Jason Stillman)

 This image provided by Jason Stillman, shows flooding in Lyons Colo., Thursday Sept. 12, 2013. Boulder County Sheriff Joe Pelle said the town of Lyons was completely cut off because of flooded roads. Flash flooding in Colorado has cut off access to towns, closed the University of Colorado in Boulder and left at least three people dead. (AP Photo/Jason Stillman)

 Residents of a neighborhood on the northern side of Boulder, Colo., work to divert floodwaters away from their homes on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013. Autorities say flooding in the area has washed out roads, left rural communities isolated and is responsible for at least three deaths. (AP Photo/Ben Neary)

Colorado FloodingResidence of an apartment house work to divert flood water from their building in Boulder, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013. Flash flooding in Colorado has cut off access to towns, closed the University of Colorado in Boulder and left at least three people dead. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

 A man takes a photograph of the overflowing St. Vrain River following overnight flash flooding, one mile east of Lyons, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. Flash flooding in Colorado has left at least three people reportedly dead and the widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents in Lyons and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Colorado FloodingA man carries a sandbag through flood waters as residence of an apartment house work to divert flood water from their building in Boulder, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013. Flash flooding in Colorado has cut off access to towns, closed the University of Colorado in Boulder and left at least three people dead. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

Colorado FloodingResidence of an apartment house work to divert flood water from their building in Boulder, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013. Flash flooding in Colorado has cut off access to towns, closed the University of Colorado in Boulder and left at least three people dead. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

 Residents of a neighborhood on the northern side of Boulder, Colo., work to divert floodwaters away from their homes on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013. Autorities say flooding in the area has washed out roads, left rural communities isolated and is responsible for at least three deaths. (AP Photo/Ben Neary)

COLORADO FLOOD Map locates towns flooded in Colorado.; 2c x 5 inches; 96.3 mm x 127 mm;

 Mountain View Fire Rescue department firefighters Jamie Wood and Steve Knoll walk through a food of water after doing a welfare check of a flooded property in rural Erie, Colo. on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013. Overnight rains along Colorado's eastern foothills caused flooding in several communities and two fatalities. (AP Photo/Peter M. Fredin)

 A business is flooded by the overflowing St. Vrain River one mile east of Lyons, Colo., following overnight flash flooding, Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. Flash flooding in Colorado has left widespread high waters that are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents in Lyons and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 The overflowing St. Vrain River swamps parked semi trucks following overnight flash flooding, one mile east of Lyons, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. The widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents in Lyons and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Paul Snyder wades into a foot of water flooding his property in rural Erie, Colo.on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013. Overnight rains along the Colorado foothills caused flooding in several communities and two fatalities. (AP Photo/Peter M. Fredin)

 The overflowing St. Vrain River swamps a home following overnight flash flooding, one mile east of Lyons, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. The widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents in Lyons and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 A man photographs the flooding in the underpass at Boulder Creek and Broadway Street in Boulder, Colo. on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013. Heavy rains and scarring from recent wildfires sent walls of water crashing down mountainsides early Thursday in Colorado, cutting off mountain towns. Boulder County was hit hardest, but flooding was reported all along the Front Range, from Colorado Springs to north of Fort Collins. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Cliff Grassmick NO SALES

 In this image made with a slow shutter speed which blurred the rushing water, flood waters course through a small park in Boulder, Colo., Thursday morning, Sept. 12, 2013. Heavy rains and scarring from recent wildfires sent walls of water crashing down mountainsides in the area. (AP Photo/Jud Valeski)

 A business is flooded by the overflowing St. Vrain River one mile east of Lyons, Colo., following overnight flash flooding, Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. Widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents in Lyons and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Local residents look over a road washed out by a torrent of water following overnight flash flooding near Left Hand Canyon, south of Lyons, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. The widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents in Lyons and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 A local resident looks out at a road washed out by a torrent of water following overnight flash flooding near Left Hand Canyon, south of Lyons, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. The widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents in Lyons and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Firefighters talk with local residents, who brought them coffee, as they keep watch over a road washed out by a torrent of water following overnight flash flooding near Left Hand Canyon, south of Lyons, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. The widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents in Lyons and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Local residents stand above a road washed out by a torrent of water following overnight flash flooding near Left Hand Canyon, south of Lyons, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. The widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents in Lyons and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Local residents look over a road washed out by a torrent of water following overnight flash flooding near Left Hand Canyon, south of Lyons, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. The widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents in Lyons and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 A fire department vehicle blocks a road washed out by a torrent of water following overnight flash flooding near Left Hand Canyon, south of Lyons, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. The widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents in Lyons and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 A road is washed out by a torrent of water following overnight flash flooding near Left Hand Canyon, south of Lyons, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. Widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents in Lyons and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 A torrent of water rushes alongside a swamped house following flash flooding near Left Hand Canyon, south of Lyons, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. The widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents in Lyons and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Firefighters keep watch over a road washed out by a torrent of water following overnight flash flooding near Left Hand Canyon, south of Lyons, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. Widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents in Lyons and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Rescue workers and vehicles stand parked waiting for roads to become passable following overnight flash flooding in Boulder, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. Heavy rains and scarring from recent wildfires sent walls of water crashing down mountainsides early Thursday in Colorado, cutting off mountain towns. Boulder County was hit hardest, but flooding was reported all along the Front Range, from Colorado Springs to north of Fort Collins.(AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

FLOODINGJason Ortiz with Namaste Solar , carriers debris from behind the business as his coworkers clean up after the flood in North Boulder, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013. Heavy rains and scarring from recent wildfires sent walls of water crashing down mountainsides early Thursday in Colorado, cutting off mountain towns. Boulder County was hit hardest, but flooding was reported all along the Front Range, from Colorado Springs to north of Fort Collins. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Paul Aiken) NO SALES

FLOODINGTrent Fallica of the City of Boulder Traffic Signal Department, checks on an electrical box next to a raging creek during the flood in North Boulder, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013. Heavy rains and scarring from recent wildfires sent walls of water crashing down mountainsides early Thursday in Colorado, cutting off mountain towns. Boulder County was hit hardest, but flooding was reported all along the Front Range, from Colorado Springs to north of Fort Collins. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Paul Aiken) NO SALES

 From left, Josh Taylor, Jason Ortiz and Bryan Ferenz with Namaste Solar, removes debris from behind the business after the flood in North Boulder, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013. Heavy rains and scarring from recent wildfires sent walls of water crashing down mountainsides early Thursday in Colorado, cutting off mountain towns. Boulder County was hit hardest, but flooding was reported all along the Front Range, from Colorado Springs to north of Fort Collins. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Paul Aiken) NO SALES

 David Platco looks over a flooded and damage storage facility in North Boulder, Colo., on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013. Heavy rains and scarring from recent wildfires sent walls of water crashing down mountainsides early Thursday in Colorado, cutting off mountain towns. Boulder County was hit hardest, but flooding was reported all along the Front Range, from Colorado Springs to north of Fort Collins. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Paul Aiken) NO SALES

CO FLASH FLOODMap locates Boulder, Colorado flash flooding; 1c x 2 1/2 inches; 46.5 mm x 63 mm;

 A car drives on a flooded road following overnight flash flooding in downtown Boulder, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. The widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents and motorists in Boulder and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 A police officer allows a special dive rescue team to pass on a closed road following overnight flash flooding in downtown Boulder, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. The widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents and motorists in Boulder and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 High water levels flow down Boulder Creek following overnight flash flooding in downtown Boulder, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. The widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents and motorists in Boulder and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 A man views dangerously high Boulder Creek following overnight flash flooding in downtown Boulder, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. The flash flooding has left at least two people dead and the widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents and motorists in Boulder and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 Local residents view dangerously high Boulder Creek following overnight flash flooding in downtown Boulder, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. Flash flooding in Colorado has left two people dead and the widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents and motorists in Boulder and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 A woman views dangerously high Boulder Creek following overnight flash flooding in downtown Boulder, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. Flash flooding in Colorado has left two people dead and the widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents and motorists in Boulder and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 A man walks past dangerously high Boulder Creek following overnight flash flooding in downtown Boulder, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. Flash flooding in Colorado has left two people dead and the widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents and motorists in Boulder and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 A city worker talks on his phone while surveying high water levels on Boulder Creek following overnight flash flooding in downtown Boulder, Colo., Thursday, Sept 12, 2013. Flash flooding in Colorado has left two people dead and the widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents and motorists in Boulder and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

 In this still frame made from ABC 7NEWS video on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013, people walk through floodwaters from a creek in Boulder, Colo. Flash flooding in Colorado has left two people dead and the widespread high waters are keeping search and rescue teams from reaching stranded residents and motorists in Boulder and nearby mountain communities as heavy rains hammered northern Colorado. (AP Photo/ABC 7NEWS) MANDATORY CREDIT

 Waters still rushing as Boulder Creek rises under the Boulder Public Library overpass. Boulder and CU authorities have been sending out constant warning and updates for the past few hours. (Gray Bender/CU Independent)

 CU student Peter Hassinger looks up flood updates and takes a video at the Arapahoe Ave. underpass. (Gray Bender/CU Independent)

 The flooded basement of Reed Hall. (Nigel Amstock/CU Independent)

 A truck floats a top a layer of water in Reed Hall. (Nigel Amstock/CU Independent)

 Reed Hall residents assess the flood in Reed 005. (Nigel Amstock/CU Independent)

 Sophomore mechanical engineering major Tyler Joy, left, bails water out of his dorm in Reed Hall. (Nigel Amstock/CU Independent)

 Students set up a giant Slip 'N Slide on Farrand Field Wednesday night. (Amy Leder/CU Independent)

 Water flows from the bridge between the Engineering Center and 28th Street on the east side of campus Wednesday night. (Amy Leder/CU Independent)

















October 20 2014

shockingwoman8375

How to Decorate for Halloween: A Dark, Spooky Forest in the Living Room





How to Decorate for Halloween: Dark, Spooky Forest

Decorating your living room and fireplace mantel for Halloween can be tricky. You don’t want it to be too spooky, and you probably want to have a little fun with it, but it has to be a look you can live with for a several weeks. We think Jennifer Griffin nailed it. She says she has no formal design training, but she certainly knows how to decorate for Halloween. 

The fact is, Jennifer clearly knows how to decorate for any occasion. Take a look at her blog Dimples and Tangles, and you’ll see what we mean.

She is one of the terrific DIY and design bloggers we invited to take part in our Halloween Style Challenge. We sent each blogger a mystery shipment of Home Depot Halloween decorations, and then we stood back while they came up with fresh and inspiring Halloween decorating ideas. 

Jennifer came up with a Halloween mantel that’s warm and colorful with interesting textures and tons of wonderful detail. Read on as she takes us, section by section, through her creative process, including how she modified some of the items we sent her to give them her special look.   

I was so excited when my friends at The Home Depot invited me to be a part of this Style Challenge. I mean, doing a project for one of my favorite companies, in my favorite season, with some fun new products… what could be better?

After receiving the assignment of decorating my mantel, I wasn’t sure what direction I wanted to go until I received my boxes of mystery items from The Home Depot. One item in particular inspired the entire design. Keep reading to find out what it was, but because of it the idea was born to do a dark, spooky forest theme.

How to Decorate for Halloween: A Halloween Mantel

THE BASE

Decorating Ideas for Halloween: Dark, Spooky Forest

Once I had a plan in my head, I started building my area section by section. First, I knew that I wanted lots of branches to mimic trees. These urns were the perfect containers to keep them stable and steady. Just as my plan was coming together, my neighbors were having their trees trimmed. Perfect timing! They were happy to throw a pile of cast off branches over my fence.

THE FOCAL POINT

Halloween Mantel Decorating Ideas: Lighted Sign

Secondly, I focused on the actual mantle. I wanted something rustic and some kind of signage. After discovering spools of festive rope lighting in a mystery box, I thought it would be fun to use it to write out a phrase. The lighting added an extra bonus and helped to set a mood, too. Since our society is all about #hashtags these days, my sister suggested adding one and I jumped on her brilliant idea.

Halloween Decorating Ideas: Lighted Sign

Halloween Decorating Ideas: How to Turn a Wreath into a Chandelier

To assemble the sign I re-used a section of an old fence panel. With its mesh coating, the rope light was really easy to work with and form. After sketching out my word–#beware– with a piece of chalk, I used a staple gun to barely grab the edge of the mesh and attach it to the wood.

When you do this, just make sure that the electrical light wire inside is moved to the other side of the rope, and that your staple only goes through the mesh, not the wire. Also, work with the lights unplugged, just to be safe!

After putting the two main components of the sign and the tree branches in place, it was time to fill in the details. Now, here’s my inspiration for the entire design…. these guys!

THE CLASSY VULTURES

Decorating Ideas for Halloween: Dark, Spooky Forest

When I found light up vultures among my mystery items, I knew right away they needed some trees to hang out in, and the idea of a spooky forest went from there.

I couldn’t resist giving them a little class, though, and added top hats and a bow ties with ribbon from the craft store. Because vultures can be stylish too, right?

To place them in the branches, I rested their feet where I could, and then used strips of floral wire to secure their bodies to the branches in various places. The cord for their lights blends in with the branches and can be plugged in with an extension cord at the base of the urn.

These cute bats needed a home in the forest, too, so I used some wire to secure them as well.

THE LAYERS

DIY Halloween Decor: A Halloween Chandlier

With the major pieces in place, it was time to add in accessories. Even with the height of the branches, I wanted to fill in some of the area close to the ceiling. One more mystery item from The Home Depot came to the rescue, but it’s serving a totally different purpose than how it started!

DIY Halloween Decor: A Halloween Chandlier

These Halloween wreaths are festive, but as-is didn’t have a place in my plan. So, they got a makeover, turning them into some statement lighting. Every spooky forest needs some glowing chandeliers, after all.

After disassembling the wreath, I wrapped it in jute rope, securing with hot glue once in a while. Since I needed to be able to get to the bottom of the battery operated candles to turn them on and off and couldn’t hot glue them to the wreath, I used some pieces of a Scotch adhesive fastener strip to secure the candle to the wreath. Then I used some Christmas beading from the craft store and some prisms I had on hand to add some sparkle, and embellished with some of the leaves from the original wreath.

To finish it off, I tied three more long pieces of rope in even sections around the rim of the wreath, knotted them together at the top, and hung with an eye hook in the ceiling.

Fall Decorating Ideas for the Living Room

With the high areas filled in, I moved on to filling in the area around the hearth, building on a hide rug to add some texture and interest. These lanterns from Home Decorators Collection are a very generous size and made a nice statement, allowing me to add some light at the ground level. I also appreciate how the rustic finish ties in with the branches. The tops are hinged, so it’s really easy to fill them and get access to light the candles.

Halloween Decorating Ideas: Dark, Spooky Forest

A few curly leafed crotons from the Home Depot Garden Center filled in some spaces with fall colors, and some rustic pumpkins that I had on hand gave a nod to fall as well.

Halloween Decorating Ideas: Dark, Spooky Forest

With a cozy chair added in, it’s the perfect spooky story spot!

Reading a spooky book in a living room decorated for Halloween

My friend enjoyed the I Spy book as well…

How to Decorate for Halloween: Dark, Spooky Forest

And, it’s even better at night when the lights are glowing and casting creepy shadows on the wall.

Mantel Decorating Ideas for Halloween: Lighted Sign

Hearth Decorating Ideas for Halloween

I hope you’re inspired to add a bit of whimsy, a bit of nature, a bit of class, and a bit of spooky to your home this season. Thank you so much Home Depot for inviting me to this challenge, it truly stretched my imagination and creativity!

Mantel Decorating Ideas for Halloween

Jennifer Griffin says her home is her hobby. She enjoys blogging all about it at Dimples and Tangles, where her posts focus on decorating and design, DIY, food, crafts, travel, and a good thrift store makeover here and there. She lives in Edmond, Oklahoma with her husband and two sweet children. 

The mystery shipment of Halloween decorations The Home Depot sent to Jennifer included these items:

For more great ideas on how to decorate for Halloween, see other articles in our Halloween Style Challenge series here on The Home Depot Blog, and follow our Halloween Style Challenge pinboard on Pinterest.

Visit The Home Depot’s online Holiday Decorations Department for everything you need to decorate your home for Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas. 



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shockingwoman8375

Outrage in Italy over 'shame' of Genoa flood chaos



By James Mackenzie

ROME Sun Oct 12, 2014 2:04pm EDT



ROME (Reuters) - Italy reacted with shock and outrage at the chronic bureaucratic and planning failures laid bare after severe flooding hit the northwestern city of Genoa, killing one man and leaving the streets of the medieval port city buried in mud and debris.

"The mud of Genoa, shame of a country," read the front page headline of Italy's biggest daily newspaper Corriere della Sera on Saturday after the flooding, which occurred less than three years after torrential floods in the same city killed seven people in 2011.

As heavy rain continued, civil protection authorities maintained a high alert until at least Monday but there were angry questions about how the city could be reduced to chaos, despite repeated warnings of a potential disaster.

Italy's mountainous and unstable geography has always made the country vulnerable to natural disasters from floods to landslides and earthquakes. Genoa's own position, between the sea and a ring of steep mountains, is particularly exposed to severe storms and flooding.

But administrative failures under successive governments, from unregulated building to poorly planned infrastructure and bureaucratic inertia have exacerbated the problems.

"What is really alarming is how little has been done in three years to make Genoa secure from another flooding disaster," said Francesco Vincenzi, president of ANBI, a national association representing the organizations charged with overseeing flooding and water safety issues.

Italy's deep economic crisis, which has seen public spending pared back to the bone in many areas, has made handling unexpected disasters more difficult but deeper systemic weaknesses have also been highlighted.

"The problem of water security in Italy isn't mainly to do with resources, it's about political will and bureaucracy," Vincenzi said.

FULL EMERGENCY

Governor Claudio Burlando estimated the damage to public infrastructure at some 200 million euros ($252.52 million) and as workers and volunteers began the cleanup, Franco Gabrielli, head of the civil protection authority, warned that the problems would persist over the weekend.

"We are still in full emergency," he told a news conference. "The forecasts for the next few hours offer no relief at all for tomorrow and Monday."

He admitted that authorities had failed to predict the huge volume of rain which fell in the space of a few hours. Parts of the city saw 700 mm of rain fall in 72 hours, not far short of the average rainfall of an entire year.

But he criticized delays in reinforcing the banks of the Bisagno river, the biggest in Genoa, which burst its swollen banks late on Thursday night and said it was a "scandal" that 35 million euros set aside for the work after the 2011 floods had not been spent because of a legal dispute.

The archbishop of Genoa, Angelo Bagnasco, called for "timely and massive" action by government to resolve the crisis and prevent similar disasters in future.

"Everyone knows what their responsibilities are," he said, his clothes spattered with mud after a tour of affected areas.

"It's absurd and shameful that bureaucracy of any kind should be blocking funds which are absolutely necessary for resolving these problems," he said.

(1 US dollar = 0.7920 euro)

(Reporting by James Mackenzie; Editing by Stephen Powell)

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Study: Chesapeake Cleanup Would Bring $22B Boon



The Chesapeake Bay region would reap an additional $22.5 billion a year from improved hurricane protection, crab and fish production and climate stability if the Obama administration's contested plan to clean up the watershed proceeds, an environmental group says.

The assessment released Monday is based on a peer-reviewed analysis of the economic benefits to the entities -- six states and the District of Columbia -- charged with reducing pollution into the nation's largest estuary.

It comes as the Environmental Protection Agency is defending its cleanup plan in federal court against a challenge from farmers and 21 attorneys general who say the pollution limits are unreasonably costly and an unjustified power grab by the federal government.



The study by Spencer Phillips, an economist at Key-Log Economics in Charlottesville, Virginia, and Beth McGee, a senior scientist at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, compared the benefits of the Chesapeake watershed in 2009, before the cleanup plan was being implemented by the states, with scenarios in which the bay is either fully restored under the plan or continues "business as usual" without additional pollution limits.

The analysis found that implementing the cleanup plan -- which seeks to achieve 60 percent of pollution reductions by 2017, and the rest by 2025 -- would yield $129.7 billion annually in benefits such as flood protection from hurricanes and other storms, improved scenery that leads to tourism, cleaner water supplies and healthy forests that reduce heat and help regulate climate.

That tally is $22.5 billion higher than the $107.2 billion of benefits the watershed provided in 2009. Without additional pollution limits, the annual economic value would drop to $101.5 billion.

The report puts the total cost of implementing the cleanup with the 64,000-square-mile watershed at $5 billion to $6 billion annually.

"We all know that reducing pollution makes great sense for our health and our environment, and today we can confirm what we have long thought: It makes good economic sense as well," said William C. Baker, president of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation.

The American Farm Bureau Federation, which is challenging the EPA plan in court, said it had not yet seen the report so it couldn't comment on the specifics. It supports cleanup generally, but "we think environmental benefits will accrue much faster if states lead the process because they are in a better position to balance the cost and benefits associated with the cleanup effort," said spokesman Will Rodger.

At issue is the scope of EPA's authority under the Clean Water Act. In 2009, President Barack Obama issued an executive order for a bay restoration after decades of state inaction, prompting the EPA to seek agreements with the states that set standards to reduce nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment that drain from rivers into the bay.

Farm runoff such as animal waste and fertilizer had created "dead zones" in the bay where nothing lives. It has taken a toll on marine life such as the bay's signature blue crab, according to the EPA.



In their challenge, the American Farm Bureau Federation and the attorneys general point to economic consequences for industry groups and the potential for the EPA to improperly seek new restrictions. They say ratification of the Chesapeake plan will lead to similar EPA efforts to reduce pollution from Midwest farms into the Mississippi River Basin.

Oral arguments in that federal lawsuit are expected later this year in Philadelphia.

Among the states that agreed to the Chesapeake plan, West Virginia is now opposing the EPA-led cleanup. Pennsylvania and New York are staying silent in the litigation, while Maryland, Delaware, Virginia and the District of Columbia signed briefs in support.

A recent study by environmentalists found states in the Chesapeake watershed have made strides in reducing pollution but in many cases fell short in implementing practices that cut contaminants from agriculture.

------

Follow Hope Yen on Twitter: http://twitter.com/hopeyen1

October 19 2014

shockingwoman8375

How to Clean Up after a Flood



VANCOUVER, Wash.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--With forecasters predicting a more severe and dramatic storm season in 2014, home and business owners should be prepared for any type of weather. To help home and business owners recover from a flood, the Institute of Inspection, Cleaning, Restoration and Certification (IICRC) has prepared a quick-reference guide for flood cleanup tips.



"When it comes to storms, education is essential," said IICRC Chairman Tony Wheelwright. "We want to make sure homeowners and business owners have access to these materials so they are able to act quickly and correctly when the time comes."

Below is a list of tips from the IICRC:

Before the storm. If a storm in your area is imminent and you are at a high risk for flooding, make sure you are prepared. Before the storm hits, gather valuable items or documents and store them in a secure, dry place. Clear all debris from gutters and downspouts and check your sump pump to ensure it is working properly. You will also want to remove items from lower floors or raise them up off of the floor to help minimize damage to property.

Consider safety. Prior to entering any storm or flood-damaged building, be wary of structural integrity and other safety hazards such as falling debris or shock hazards. Make sure to shut off all electricity in the affected areas, even if the electricity is down, as it is oftentimes restored without notice.

Also, make sure that you have the proper personal protective equipment and try to stay out of floodwaters as much as possible to further reduce the risk of injury. Items such as protective clothing, sturdy shoes, gloves, eye protection and even an organic vapor respirator (paint respirator) can protect you from exposure to dangerous microorganisms that can grow quickly.

Work quickly. Even though it can take mold a few days to appear, anything that can be done to control or minimize its speed of growth is vital. Mold thrives in moist environments with stale air, organic food sources (paper, wood, etc.) and temperatures between 68° F and 86° F. To reduce these risks, keep air moving by opening windows and doors. Fresh air discourages the growth of mold and other microorganisms and can also help reduce inhalation risks.

Clean and disinfect everything. The first step in the cleanup process is to remove and dispose of all, wet porous components such as mattresses, pillows, molding, insulation and portions of damaged walls. This also includes floor coverings such as carpet, pads, laminate, tile and sheet vinyl. Wood flooring should also be removed to expose wet saturation pockets underneath and allow for proper drying, cleaning and sanitizing. Other items such as wet clothing, furniture and household fabrics can usually be salvageable after a hot machine wash, a lengthy detergent soak and the liberal use of a disinfectant solution.

Structural areas such as wall cavities, studs and other fixtures will also need to be properly disinfected. This can be done by pressure washing with detergent solutions working from top to bottom.



Dry it out. The next step is to allow the space to dry thoroughly before reconstruction. This is possibly the most difficult step for home and business owners because even if a surface feels dry to the touch, that doesn't mean it is. Dryness is